Eaglet Picture Index
Summary of Eaglet Info
JudyB-Eagles Home

About the Nests

Names in bold italic are nests with no reports for at least several years.

Last Updated February 4, 2016

Information about the nests is being updated to the beginning of the 2016 nesting season.
work in progress

 
Notes
 

Alaska
Haines

This cam is the result of a partnership between the Hancock Wildlife Foundation in British Columbia and the American Bald Eagle Foundation in Haines, Alaska. The pair raised two fledglings in 2007, nested in a different location in 2008, and raised two fledglings in 2009. The cam has not operational since 2009, and there's been no report on nest activity.


JudyB's s'cap - June 26, 2009

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early May, chicks in early to mid June, and fledging in late August or early September.

British Columbia
Burnaby

no cam -
observations by WillPatt

This nest is located in a tree in a small park in a residential area of Burnaby, BC. It's unusual not only for being is such a populated area, but for being in a tree with leaves that hide the nest (parents generally seem to prefer an unobstructed view from the nest), and for being several miles from the nearest body of water large enough to catch fish. This nest successfully fledged 2 eaglets in 2007, and fledged 2 eaglets in 2008, though one had poor feather development on its wings, making us wonder how that would affect its survival. The eagles haven't nested there since 2008.

Burnaby nest
WillPatt
's photo - April 13, 2007 - parent in nest
© 2009 Will Patterson, used with permission, all rights reserved
(note that the leaves are just beginning to open - they'll get much bigger!)

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early or mid April, chicks in mid May, and fledging in early to mid August.

British Columbia
Delta 1

no cam

This pair either abandoned their nest or were driven off by a nearby pair in 2007, but returned in 2008 to raise two eaglets. The older one fledged successfully, but the younger one fell from the nest when he was almost 11 weeks. He was found and taken to the Orphaned WildLife Rehabilitation Society (O.W.L.), where he was found to have no major injuries, but was underweight so they admitted him. He was released about 5 weeks later. Eagles believed to be his sister and one of their parents were seen in the area until he was released, at which time they all disappeared - we like to think heading North together for the salmon runs. The nest had fallen apart quite a bit by the end of the 2008 nesting season, and wasn't substantially rebuilt for 2009. The pair laid two eggs, both of which hatched. The older eaglet fell to its death when part of the nest broke away when he was about 3-1/2 weeks old; the younger eaglet (nicknamed "Bandit" on the Hancock Wildlife forum) fledged prematurely when a branch broke off the tree when he was about 11 weeks old, and was taken to O.W.L. for rehabilitation, and subsequently released at Chehalis in the fall, when there were other eagles in the area. By nesting season in 2010, there wasn't much of anything left in the tree, and the pair made a nest on the ground and laid at least two eggs; one was broken by the time David Hancock arrived to check it out, and the other had apparently died several days before David examined it. No reports since 2010. We continue to hope that they will find a safe place to nest and raise a family.

 
Photo of nest and the two eaglets from 2008 by Judy Barrows © July 15, 2008
all rights reserved

This pair had eggs in early April and chicks in early-mid May, but nearby eagles had chicks in early April - so there may be some flexibility in nesting time in the area.

British Columbia
Delta 2

Link

There have been eagles in this territory since at least the late 1990s. The initially built this nest, then nested on high tension power poles for a few years, then moved back to the nest in 2010 and successfully raised two eaglets. A camera was added for the 2011 nesting season. The pair laid 2 eggs in 2011, both of which hatched. The older chick, named Oreo by local schoolchildren, fell from the nest when about 10 weeks old; he was unharmed but couldn't be returned to the nest so was taken to O.W.L. and fledged from there at 14 weeks; the younger chick, named Jet, fledged successfully from the nest a few days earlier. The pair again laid 2 eggs in 2012; both hatched, and they were named Goldwing and Linux in honor of Richard Pitt, who rode a Goldwing motorcycle and much preferred the Linux operating system to Windows; the older chick died when she was a bit over 7 weeks old, possibly because a bone got stuck in her crop (based on how it looked on the cam) or perhaps because of contaminants in something she ate; the younger chick fledged successfully on her second attempt, after ending up grounded and rescued by O.W.L. for a checkup the first time she left the tree. The adults here seem to spend less time on the nest than many other parents, and seem to have trouble finding enough food for two chicks as the chicks get larger and begin to eat more. The pair laid 2 eggs in 2013; only one hatched; feathers were seen as the second egg deteriorated, so we suspect the chick inside died before or during the attempt to hatch. The chick was named Tux, after the mascot for the Linux operating system, and fledged successfully.

2014 was a year of miracles. Observers noticed a problem with Mom Delta's left leg on February 8, and David Hancock and Bev Day from O.W.L. reviewed the videos and felt it was likely broken, or at least badly sprained. Other eagles were seen in the area, so the injury could be the result of a fight with another female for control of the nest - in which case it looks as if Mom won - but at a price. We thought they might not nest - and they were late laying eggs, but they did lay two eggs. We also weren't sure they would hatch - the female must be able to support the male while he fertilizes the eggs, and Mom was mostly standing on one leg - but amazingly both of them hatched, and the eaglets named Ariel and Hunter by the people living on the nest property both fledged successfully, the first time both chicks fledged without intervention.

The eagles returned as usual in the fall of 2014; Mom was still favoring her left leg, but they prepared their nest and laid two eggs in mid-March, then partway through the nesting cycle, something disrupted incubation - construction nearby (which might have dislocated other pairs who suddenly were interested in taking over the nest), a re-injury to Mom's leg - or something we may never know. What we do know is that after a couple of weeks of steady incubation, the eggs were left alone for hours at a time, including several nights when the temperatures dipped near freezing, and not surprisingly, even though they resumed incubating somewhat more consistently after a time, neither egg hatched. I'm sad that we didn't have chicks this year - but consider it a small price to pay if Mom is finally able to rest and heal and return as the strong capable adult she was before her injury.

And then - as we were wondering how we could afford to keep this nest streaming for another season - on August 29, just weeks before the eagles might return, the nest and tree came down in a wind storm, damaging both cams in the process. And thanks to a whole lot of people, we (Hancock Wildlife Foundation, where I'm a volunteer admin for their website and forum) raised $7000 to bring in a lift and climbers, build a nest in a nearby tree where the pair often perched, retrieve the two cams from Delta 3 and install them here - and have everything ready for the return of the eagles. The eagles returned in early October - and as of early November, it looks as if they've accepted the new nest, and are beginning to fix it up for 2016.

Delta 2 Nest Tree courtesy of plantocean
Photo of original nest and "Jet" from 2010 by planetocean © July 16, 2010
all rights reserved

new 2015 nest at Delta 2
Photo of new nest and cams being installed by Karen Bills © September 6, 2015
used with permission, all rights reserved

This pair had eggs in early March which hatched in mid-April.

British Columbia
Delta OWL

Link

This nest is located in the same general area of Delta, British Columbia, as the Orphaned WildLife Rehabilitation Society (O.W.L.), which cared for Delta Dan, who fell out of the Delta 1 nest in 2008 and needed some extra help to get ready for the fall migration. This nest was new in 2008, and while the pair built a nest and spent time there, they did not lay any eggs (not uncommon for the first year of a new nest). They laid two eggs in 2009, but sadly the eggs did not hatch, although they continued to incubate for at least two weeks past the likely hatching time. Part of the nest collapsed as they were rebuilding it for the 2010 season, and they've divided their time between trying to fix it, trying to start a new nest, and possibly being a bit lost (though that's assigning human characteristics). A raccoon has been seen in their nest several times, adding to the difficulty of rebuilding it for the 2010 season. They did not nest in 2010, and in the end the nest was completely destroyed by wind, but Hancock Wildlife Foundation and O.W.L. were able to shore up the nest with reinforcing in September 2010, so we're hoping the eagles will be back in 2011. This pair laid 2 eggs in 2011 and tended them diligently, but they didn't hatch; the first may have been fertile - some of us thought we saw a pip and heard peeping; the second was recovered from the nest by David Hancock after the eagles stopped incubating and analysis showed it was infertile. Additional branches were added to the nest in fall 2011 when the cams were cleaned. The eagles only stopped by the nest once or twice in 2012, and local observers reported that the male may have died or left the area (pairs do split up after unsuccessful seasons); the female was still in the area, often perching at the top of the nest tree, and it appeared as if there may be males in the area showing an interest, so maybe 2013 will be the lucky year for this nest. An interesting aside - a pair of young raccoons slept in the tree a couple of times, and one alone was there once or twice afterwards; not good for our goal of having nesting eagles here - but cute to watch.

No news since 2012.

Delta OWL nest
Photo of nest by Karen Bills © August 2009
used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on other nests in the area, eggs could come any time from late February to mid April.

British Columbia
Harrison Mills

Link

Mr and Mrs Honeycomb

This nest is 175 feet up a huge Douglas fir - on the 10th green of the Sandpiper Golf course at Pretty Estates Resort in Harrison Mills, BC (site of the Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival). The 2 PTZ cams also show the eagle activity on the Chehalis - Harrison Flats to the North East. 2013 was the first year Hancock Wildlife Foundation had a camera in this nest, and David Hancock's research suggests that the pair we watched originally moved from the next territory over when licensed utility construction led to the removal of their former nest. We were worried that the nest might not be occupied because we didn't see any activity in the fall, when eagles usually do the preliminary work on their nests - and the first member of the pair who nested did not arrive until March 5th, and both were not seen until March 10. They laid their first egg April 4, after a modest amount of work on the nest; a second egg followed 4 days later. Unlike some pairs, they started incubating full time once the first egg was laid, so the eggs also hatched 4 days apart. The chicks were named Birdie and Bogey by the folks at Pretty Estates Resort (sponsor of the nest), and little Bogey held his own for a couple of weeks, but once Birdie started his/her growth spurt, the size difference was too great and the much smaller younger chick was no longer fed. Bogey was 23 days old when he/she died. Birdie fledged successfully, and didn't return to the nest until four days later; he/she made a final visit to the nest a few days later. Observers noted that the adults did not spend much time in the nest before the eggs were laid, and David Hancock noted that they seemed to be following the pattern of wilderness eagles, who only use the nest for raising young, rather than the more urban eagles we observe on many cams, who eat and mate at the nest before laying eggs, and use them as feeding platforms for the eaglets once they fledge.

The eagles returned in the fall of 2013, and put in a lot of work on their nest, making it ready for spring. The pair only laid one egg in 2014, and sadly it didn't hatch. 2015 was better - as in 2013, the pair laid two eggs four days apart, and Driver and Putter hatched four days apart. There were a few days when we held our breath as the older chick hit her growth spurt and food deliveries seemed down - but happily they picked up again in time to help the younger chick catch up - and both fledged successfully, 4 days apart.

Harrison Mills nest
Photo of nest by Karen Bills © September 2012
used with permission, all rights reserved

This pair laid their eggs in early April in 2013, but we're not sure if that's normal for them.

British Columbia
Hornby Island

Link

The nest is located about 30 meters (100 feet) up an evergreen tree, and is situated on private property about 100 meters from the ocean on Hornby Island in the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and the British Columbia mainland. According to Doug Carrick, the eagles built their first nest in the fall of 1989 and fledged their first eaglet in 1990. This will be their twenty-first year of nesting; they have fledged 18 eaglets in 20 years - just under one a year, which is considered average for eagles in this area. There has been a camera in the nest since September 2004, and it was first connected to the internet in spring 2006. The pair laid two eggs in 2006, neither of which hatched; the camera was offline in 2007 after the line was damaged in a winter storm but Doug reported that they raised and fledged two eaglets (Thunder and Lightning) that year; they did not lay any eggs in 2008. In 2009, they laid two eggs, both of which hatched; the younger eaglet Echo died in a freak accident, after becoming tangled in the female's feathers; older eaglet Hope fledged successfully. The pair laid two eggs in 2010; one hatched, and was named Phoenix; she died at 76 days old of acute aspergillosis, a respiratory infection likely caused by spores in the nesting material. The pair laid two eggs in 2011; both appeared to have some difficulty breaking out of their shells, but did hatch and the eaglets named Alexandra (for Alexandra Morton) and David (for David Suzuki) fledged successfully. Doug Carrick decided to stop streaming his cams for this nest in 2012; we think two eggs were laid, and know that one was hatched, and that chick, named Elizabeth (for Elizabeth May) by Doug Carrick fledged successfully. The Hornby Eagle Group Project Society was able to install a cam in a tree about 230 feet/70 meters away, providing a different view of these much-loved eagles. The Hornby eagles were seen in their territory in 2013, but did not lay any eggs. In 2014 the pair did nest; we're not sure how many eggs they laid, but one hatched, and the eaglet named Scootch fledged successfully.

2015 was a year of sadness and change - both adults returned as usual in the fall of 2015, but it was reported by observers in early March that the female (known as Ma) may have been injured in a fight with an intruder; she was seen on the nest during the first half of March and appeared to be healing as of March 14, but more eagles were drawn to the area for a herring spawn near shore - and Ma hasn't been seen since March 15; Pa was seen for a while longer and another female was seen in the area, but no one used the nest.

Pa returned in early October 2015, and was seen with another female by mid-October, but we don't know what the 2016 nesting season will bring.


Photo of Hope in the nest June 14, 2009, 9:21 am by boonibarb
© 2009, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid to late July.

British Columbia
Lafarge

Link

The Lafarge downtown Vancouver concrete plant is on the waterfront of Vancouver's inner harbor, beside the main CP rail tracks and sidings, in the heart of Vancouver's busy container and grain port facilities. The nest tree is alone on the property, right on the water's edge and outside the property's fenced area. An artificial nest structure, designed by David Hancock, sits beside the tree where it can be used by the eagles both as a perch and as a replacement nest site if something happens to the tree. This pair successfully raised three eaglets in 2011, even though the oldest was very big, and the youngest almost a week younger. In 2012 history repeated itself as the parents again successfully reared 3 chicks to fledging. New to the Lafarge nest in the 2013 season is a PTZ cam with sound that will give us a “bird’s eye view” of this very special eagle family. The pair again laid three eggs in 2013, and all three hatched, but the youngest died within a day of hatching, and the middle one died when he/she was 11 days old - no clue why - the chick had seemed healthy until the final day, when it was lethargic. The remaining chick, named "Feathers," fledged successfully. The pair laid 3 eggs in 2014; the first and third eggs hatched successfully and the second started to hatch but it appeared that the chick was unable to to peck around the shell so it could split, either because it was stuck or because it was too weak, and sadly the chick died; the remaining chicks, named J.J. amd Jess, fledged successfully.

2015 brought a lot of changes. The nest tree at the Lafarge site had been at risk for a while, and blew down during a bad storm in October 2014; the eagles returned soon afterwards, and chose to rebuild a nest near Pandora Street that they'd used before moving to Lafarge, rather than adopting the artificial nest. By mid March it appeared that one of the adults was always at the new nest - so we suspected that there were eggs - and we think there were chicks by mid to late April, though they weren't seen until May 11 and 17. All was going well until mid-June - when Ma Lafarge flew into power lines while being chased by a flock of crows, and died instantly. Happily Pa Lafarge was up to the task, and began feeding the chicks and staying by the nest at night, roles the female more often played, and the 7-1/2 week old chicks were old enough to be safe from most predators while he was away hunting for them. Local observers named the eaglets Pan and Dora, in honor of the location of their new nest, and both fledged successfully.

As of mid November 2015, Pa is back, and it looks as if he's found a lovely new partner, whom observers are calling Lady or Lady Lafarge. She's spending a lot of time perched on the rails of the artificial nest, sometimes with Pa (and they flew off in unison one time I watched - which looked to me as if they were developing a bond) - and both have also been seen at Pandora Street. It's early for them to have to decide and work on a nest - and we are wondering what they will do.


Photo of the Lafarge nest showing its industrial setting March 14, 2012, by gemini
© 2012, used with permission, all rights reserved

the Lafarge eagles new nest for 2015
Photo of eaglets Pan and Dora branching at the Pandora nest, by Annemie
© July 10, 2015, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid to late July.

British Columbia
Pacific Coast Terminals
Port Moody

Link

According to residents in the area, there's been a nest here for about 18 years. The pair appeared to have eggs in 2010, but unfortunately they either didn't hatch or the chicks died before they were large enough to be seen from the ground. Pacific Coast Terminals has given Hancock Wildlife permission to put a cam on this nest for 2011 - but the eagles are busily building a new nest at another location on the PCT site. We hoped that they would move back to the nest with the cam once they completed their "spare" nest - but they chose the new nest; ground observers reported there were two eaglets; one appeared to fall from the nest at fledging age, tumbling down through a number of branches before catching itself, and then was seen flying to another tree - but hasn't been seen since; the second fledged more traditionally. Sad news in 2012 - the eagles again chose the same tree as 2011, fixed up the nest, and laid their eggs - but the tree blew over in a bad windstorm, fortunately before the eggs had hatched. Both adults were seen in the area, but as far as we know, they did not nest again. Keeping our fingers crossed for 2013 - and hoping they move back to the nest with the cam. No cam in 2013, but local observers reported at least two chicks, at least one of whom fledged successfully.
Local observers reported seeing a pair near the nest in spring of 2014, and were hopeful that they had or would soon have chicks - but around June 5 an injured adult female was found near the nest and brought to OWL, and only one adult was seen the next day. No one was seen on subsequent visits - but happily the female was released July 22nd, so we're hoping the pair will returrn and nest successfully in 2015.

It looks as if the female returned (a banded female was seen) and they appeared to be incubating - but no chicks were seen. Hoping for better luck in 2016.

original nest at Port Moody, BC
Photo of original nest with cam May 13, 2010 by urban Eagle
©2010 Larry Dorosh, used with permission, all rights reserved

new nest at Port Moody, BC new nest at Port Moody, BC
Two views of the new nest, November 23, 2010
Photo across the water towards the Port Moody plant is by urban Eagle ©2010 Larry Dorosh, used with permission, all rights reserved
Photo from the Port Moody facility is by sawrat ©2010, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on other nests in the area, eggs could come any time from late February to mid April.

British Columbia
Sidney

Link

This pair fledged 2 eaglets, named Victoria and Sidney, in 2006. They laid two eggs in 2007, one of which hatched and successfully fledged; that eaglet was named Skye. This pair was observed building a feeding platform in 2007, which they made into a second nest that they used for 2008; attempts to place cameras in the alternative nest were unsuccessful - the tree was too high for the crane - so information for 2008 was provided by observers on the ground - who reported the successful fledging of three eaglets, named Sunny, Angel and Freddy. In 2009, there was a wide angle cam in each tree, and they again used the "new" nest, successfully fledging three eaglet, named Breeze, Hero, and Tiny/Tink. The old nest blew down in a windstorm in 2010, but the eagles were fortunately using the "new" nest (hereafter known as "the nest") again. They laid two eggs, but one was stolen by a raven shortly before hatching; the other egg hatched, and the chick, nicknamed Solo, successfully fledged. A wide-angle cam with night vision has been added for the 2011 nesting season. The pair laid 3 eggs in 2011 and all hatched successfully, but when they were about a month old, the oldest caught her foot in some fishing line that had been brought to the nest and ended up hooked to the side of the nest; thanks to a lot of work by a lot of people, a crane was brought in and she was freed; all three chicks, named Flyer, Snuggles and Burrows by local schoolchildren, fledged successfully. The adults may be working on a new nest for 2012 - guess we'll have to wait and see what happens. The adults did build a new nest on private proterty in 2012, and no pictures have been published, per request of the landowners; local observers reported that they again fledged three eaglets. The pair used the same private nest in 2013; only one chick was seen, and it fledged successfully. Mom and Dad Sidney were seen in their territory in 2014, but apparently didn't nest. They've been seen near their 2011 nest - so we are curious to see what they will do in 2015.

The pair moved back to their new/dead-tree nest in 2015, and successfully raised one eaglet, known as Herbie Epicure Hancock; things didn't work out for a cam for 2016, but maybe we'll be able to see them again eventually.


JudyB's photo - July 14, 2008
©2008 Judy Barrows, all rights reserved
(original nest is in the tall tree on the far right)

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early to mid March, chicks in mid April, and fledging in mid to late July.

British Columbia
White Rock

Link

This nest is on a private portion of the White Rock bluff overlooking Boundary Bay. The nest tree is only about 100 feet from the back porch of the family who has generously provided the cameras, and the nest is about 120 feet up the tree. It was built in November 2009 after the pair's original nest, 500 yards south of this site, was disturbed by construction. The eagles successfully raised two chicks, named Alpha and Bravo by the landowners, at this new nest in 2010. In 2011, their first year on cam, the eagles laid two eggs, both of which hatched; the two eaglets, named Charlie and Delta, fledged successfully. The nest looked a little precarious by the end of the 2011 nesting season, so additional supports were added when the cams were cleaned in fall 2011. 2012 was another good year for this pair, and eaglets Echo and Foxtrot ("Foxy") fledged successfully. Their nest was looking a bit precarious by the end of 2012, so when David Hancock installed additional PTZ cams, he made sure they would also provide a look at another tree that looked promising for a nest, and may have added a few branches to help them get started in case they decide to move. 2013 was a hard year at White Rock; it appeared to many observers that a new, possibly young, pair took over the nest. They laid two eggs, but were not consistent about incubating them, and near the hatch date, a subadult landed while the adults were away and broke one of the eggs; David Hancock reviewed the video of the event, and said it looked as if the embryo had stopped developing at 10-12 days, probably from lack of incubation. The adults stopped caring for the remaining egg after that, and it was destroyed by a juvenile eagle a week or two later; it also appeared only minimally developed. As I write this in October 2013, a pair of eagles is working on the nest - and we're hoping for a better year in 2014.
2014 was a much better year, though not without a bit of sorrow - we're not sure if the original pair returned, or if last year's pair matured, but the adults seemed very competent, and laid three eggs; about half way through the incubation period, we lost one of the eggs - it stuck to the adult's chest when he got up (perhaps already cracked?), and fell off as he moved to the side of the nest and bounced off the nest rails; it appeared intact, but it was soon obvious that one of the eggs was broken, and the female removed the pieces. The other eggs hatched successfully, and the chicks named Indy and Jules fledged successfully.
All went well in 2015 - two eggs were laid, and the chicks named Kilo and Lima fledged successfully - but about two weeks after they fledged, while they were still using the nest for food drops - the nest cam down. We are very happy that both fledglings were old enough that they didn't need a nest - and we're eager to see what the adults will do next year.

cam installation at White Rock, BC
Photo of David Hancock installing the camera, September 16, 2010, by richardpitt
©2010 Richard Pitt, used with permission, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Based on other nests in the area, eggs could come any time from late February to mid April.

California
Anacapa Island
Oak Canyon

no cam

adults A21(M) & A11(F)

Male A21 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2003 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz Island) and female A11 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2002 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz Island) established a territory in the Yellowbanks area on the south shore of Santa Cruz Island in 2008 (see below).

They were a non-breeding pair in 2009 and 2010, then moved to Anacapa and became the Oak Canyon pair; A21 was seen in the Yellowbanks area with A48 for a while early in 2011, before settling on Anacapa with A11 and raising their first eaglet. Dr. Sharpe noted that their new territory is visible across the water from their former small Yellowbanks territory on Santa Cruz Island. The nest is on an island that is not normally accessible, so reports were sketchy - but we know they laid at least two eggs, and at least one hatched, and that chick fledged successfully. Their nest is on a hillside, and near to the ground - the eaglet jumped down and ran away when Dr. Sharpe and his team arrived for banding. The pair nested again in 2012 and appeared to be incubating or brooding when the nest was viewed from a boat in early April, but there didn't seem t be any activity when the nest was viewed from a boat in May; a site visit in June confirmed that the nest had failed, though they don't know when or why, due to the limited access granted to the biologists. Another interesting development is that male A21 was seen with A11 on Anacapa and also seen spending time with female A48 on Santa Cruz - so it will be interesting to see if there is a switch of partners in the works. Success for A21 and A11 in 2013 - we don't know how many eggs they laid - but there was a healthy chick in the nest when the team arrived for banding, and A90(M)/CBrink fledged successfully. A pair appeared to be nesting in 2014, but the nest can only be seen by sea when one is quite a distance from the shore, and the presence of nesting cormorants kept the IWS team from approaching the nest at banding time, so we don't know if there were fledglings, and if there were, they were not banded or tagged.
2015 was similar - it appeared while viewing from a boat that the pair was incubating and then brooding, and a chick was seen June 1st - but we don't know how s/he did or if there were other chicks because of the restrictions on access to the nest.

Eaglet in Oak Canyon nest - June 7, 2011, courtesy of Peter Sharpe of the Institute for Wildlife Studies
Peter Sharpe's photo - June 7, 2011

California
Catalina Island
Empire Quarry

no cam

adults K51(M) & K03(F)

A new pair was found in 2014 (initially called Cherry Cove before their nest was found) who may nest this year in this new territory near Twin Rocks. K51 hatched in 2005 from an egg produced at the San Francisco Zoo and fostered in the Pinnacle Rock nest, and spent some time with Wray a couple of years ago while K01 was off on vacation; K03 is a 2007 naturally hatched chick from the Seal Rocks nest; they built a nest and laid two eggs, but the eggs didn't hatch (not unusual for a new pair). Unfortunately 2015 was a repeat - two eggs were laid, but neither hatched. Maybe next year....

empire quarry eagles
photo from Maria's video - March 2014

California
Catalina Island
Middle Ranch (formerly Thompson Reservoir)

no cam

adults K93(M) & A32(F) (through 2009)
adults K93(M) & A37(F) (through 2013)
adults K88(M) & A37(F) (2014)
A37(F) alone (2015)

Male K93 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 1999 and released from the Bullrush Hacktower on Catalina Island) and female A32 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2004 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz) became a pair in 2007. Dr. Sharpe and Steffani of IWS built them an artificial nest in December 2007 because they hadn't had much luck with nest building; they added branches and used it as a feeding platform, but did not lay any eggs in 2008. They built a nice new nest for 2009, but did not lay any eggs. In 2010, A32 was replaced by A37 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) - and the pair laid their first egg ever! The egg hatched, but the eaglet (male K-98) sadly died a couple of days after fledging, most likely from dehydration; it was very hot, and he had been fed a lot of squirrel (which is dry) and not a lot of fish (which contains a lot of water). This pair had another sad year in 2011; they laid two eggs, one of which hatched but failed to thrive and died within a week or two of hatching; it's not clear if the second egg disappeared during incubation or failed to hatch - hard to see into the nest. We're hoping they'll finally have a successful season in 2012. Another sad year for the Middle Ranch pair in 2012 - they laid two eggs, but one disappeared a few days later, and the other apparently broke or was broke about three weeks after it was laid. Here's hoping they'll have better luck in 2013. K93 and A37 laid two eggs in 2013; one disappeared within the first 10 days, the other hatched and K30 (M)/Blaze fledged successfully. Sad news in fall 2013 - the IWS team received a report that an eagle was dangling from a tree; they were able to rescue K93 and brought him for treatment, but circulation to his lower leg and foot had been cut off for too long, so he was euthanized on October 30. Rest in peace, K93.
Male K88 (naturally hatched from Twin Rocks in 2008) had been spending time with K87 as pre-nesting adults, and went with her to West End in the fall of 2013, where she stayed but he did not (I suspect the resident male K01 helped him make that decision); he was seen with A37 in early February 2014, and they produced two eggs, one of which broke and the other disappeared near hatching time.
2015 was a year off here - male K88 moved to the Pinnacle Harbor Nest, and A37 spent the spring alone; the wonderful annual summary on the CHIL forum (All Eagles All The Time: Season 2014/2015) reported that male K00 (formerly from the Twin Rocks nest) had been seen with A37 - he hadn't been successful at Twin Rocks - so we're all hoping they will finally have chicks in 2016.

picture of Middle Ranch nest
eaglegal's photo - March 7, 2011
(the nest as seen from the road near Pimu's enclosure)

California
Catalina Island
Pinnacle Rock

no cam

Adults K65(M) & K92(F) (through 2008)
Adults K65(M) & K56(F) (through 2011)
Adults K73(M) & K56(F) (through 2014)
Adults K88(M) & ?K56(F)?

Male K65 was removed from a nest near Steep, Vancouver Island, BC, in 1986 and released from the Bullrush Hacktower on Catalina Island; female K92 was raised at the San Francisco Zoo in 1999 and released on Catalina Island from the Bullrush Hacktower. This pair was allowed to keep their eggs in 2007 (instead of having them removed for incubation), and both hatched - making them the first pair of chicks to hatch naturally without human assistance on Catalina Island since 1945; males K00 and male K71 both fledged successfully, but K71 was found dead in September. The pair laid two eggs in 2008; both hatched and male K70 and female K71 fledged successfully, but K71 was found dead July 24, probably of starvation; K70 was still on Catalina Island as of January 2009. (There were two K71s because numbers of eagles that die are reused; it was a coincidence that the number was used again at the same nest.).

There was apparently a change of partners at the beginning of 2009, with female K56 becoming K65's new mate. We don't know what might have happened, only that K92 has not been seen. K56 was from an egg laid at Seal Rocks, taken to IWS for incubation, and then fostered back into the Seal Rocks nest in 2005. The new pair laid two eggs in 2009; one was lost a week or so before its hatch date and the other produced female K99, who fledged successfully but was sadly lost 2 months later, probably while trying to fly to the mainland. The pair laid two eggs in 2010; one was lost a month or so later, and the other produced female K95, who fledged successfully. This pair laid two eggs in 2011; one was lost fairly early, and the other failed to hatch. We hope they'll have better luck in 2012.

There was another change in partners, with male K73 replacing K65, who had a physical encounter with K25 (the Seal Rocks male) in the fall of 2011; K65 ended up in the water and a boater followed as the 25-year-old eagle made the long swim back to shore; Steffani went to check in the morning in case he was injured on the beach but could not find him; he hasn't been seen since. The new male K73/Wind is one of the West End triplets from 2007 (and a personal favorite of mine - that was the last year that they had three adults helping to raise the chicks, and it was such fun to see how they shared the duties). The new pair unfortunately did not have a good year - the first two eggs were lost within a couple of days of being laid, and while they incubated the third egg past the expected hatching time, it didn't hatch. Hopefully they'll have better luck in 2013. 2013 was a good year for the relatively new pair - they laid two eggs, both hatched, and K14 (M)/Shay Awahili and K16 (F)/Rose both fledged successfully. K14 was rescued from the water about a month after he fledged, and sadly his body was found on a mainland beach about a month later. The pair laid two eggs in 2014, one of which hatched, and K44 (M)/Arnie fledged successfully.

There was another partner change for the 2015 season - male K73/Wind apparently went north for his post-season vacation, and was sadly discovered dead under a power line near Glenwood, WA. It took a while for the IWS crew to identify the new male here - it turned out to be K88, who was the male at Middle Ranch in 2014; the female no longer has tags - they are guessing it's still K56, but would need to get a close shot of her leg band to be sure. The new pair laid two eggs and one hatched, but sadly the chick disappeared when it was around 4 weeks old, perhaps in a fall from the nest. We're hoping for a happier and more productive year in 2016.

Pinnacle Rock nest
eaglegal's photo - February 11, 2009
(the nest is at the end of that narrow point)

Pinnacle Rock nest
Eagle Guy's photo - February 27, 2009
Pinnacle Rock pair with their first egg.

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February and early March, chicks in early April, and fledging from mid-June to early July.

California
Catalina Island
Rattlesnake Canyon

no cam

adults K80(M) and K47(F)

This is a relatively new nest with male K80 (who came from an egg laid at the San Francisco Zoo and fostered into the West End nest in 1998) and female K47 (produced at the San Francisco Zoo in 2004 and fostered into the Seal Rocks nest). They nested and laid eggs in both 2008 and 2009, but the eggs disappeared shortly after they were laid both years. It seems that the instinct to incubate the eggs isn't quite as strong as the instinct to produce and lay them, especially for male K80. This pair laid two eggs in 2010, and were successful in hatching both of them, and raising them to the point of fledging; unfortunately both were found dead of unknown causes within a couple of days after fledging, under a bush near the nest. 2011 was a good year for this pair - they laid two eggs, both of which hatched, and both eaglets K15(F)/Ho'ihoulala "Lala" and K19(M)/Robben fledged successfully and were still on the island and doing well as of mid-August 2011. This pair definitely have their ups and downs - and this year started out well, but ended sadly; both of their eggs hatched, but the younger chick was apparently blown out of the nest during a terrible wind storm when he was about a month old; the remaining eaglet was a male, banded as K22 and named Jerry; he fledged successfully, but apparently drowned about a month later. K80 and K47 laid two eggs in 2013; both hatched, but there was only one chick in the nest during a check about a month later; it's likely that sibling rivalry was involved, but with nests that are only checked once or twice a week, it's hard to know what might have happened. The remaining chick K39 (F)/Lina fledged successfully, and was rescued from the water about 6 weeks after she fledged, but tried again to reach the mainland about 3 weeks later, and her body was found near Laguna Beach.

The pair moved to a new nest for 2014, and laid two eggs, one of which hatched; the eaglet K46 (F)/Tiana was banded June 14, and less than two weeks later, a large branch naturally broke off from the tree, and 64-day-old K46 was found on the ground with two broken legs. She was taken to the mainland for surgery, then returned to the IWS office to recover; the pins were removed August 13, and she tried to stand August 20; by the end of the day on August 23, she was able to stand on both legs without using her wings for balance, and even managed to put one foot on a fish! On September 3 K46 was moved to a small enclosure within the enclosure of non-releasable adult Pimu; she adapted well, and on September 11 was let into the larger enclosure to share it with Pimu, and she was soon on the high perches. K46 has some feather damage, but it did not appear to interfere with her flight from one perch to another, and she was able to curve around the tree in the middle of the enclosure while flying (probably trickier than a straight flight), so she was given a backpack transmitter and released near her nest on October 13, with 2 pounds of mackerel nearby; her parents were in the area and saw the release but didn't interact with her. K46 took her first flight in the wild at noon, then tried a couple of perches and spent the afternoon perching. On October 16 she discovered a deer carcass being shared by other eagles, ravens and hawks and joined in the feast - her first feeding in the wild! After keeping an eye on K46 for a bit over a week, the staff had commitments elsewhere for a week or so - and when they went to look for her in her nest territory on October 24 - they couldn't find her! They searched with their tracking unit for several days, and hoped she had a faulty transmitter - and then they discovered she'd left the territory, and was living in the town of Avalon! The new nest is near a children's science camp - so K46 grew up accustomed to the noise and bustle of people. The IWS team tried to lure her away from town by putting food on the hillside, and she explored that area and found the food - but returned to town. On November 20 they trapped her, gave her a health check (a bit underweight but otherwise fine) and released her beside the reservoir near the Middle Ranch territory. It's an area where there's food that's relatively easy to catch, less ravens to harrass her, and an adult eagle (female A-37) that she can watch to learn eagle behavior. The team provided food twice a day while she was at the reservoir, to encourage her to stay there and to help her transition to hunting on her own. On November 27 they found her eating a bird she probably caught, and by December 4 she began exploring the areas outside her new home territory, as most young eagles do 4-6 weeks after fledging. As of the end of December, she was flying well, and spending time at the Reservoir - and occasionally visiting her "roommate" Pimu (who is not necessarily thrilled to see another eagle nearby); food is now being tied down in the water to keep ravens from taking it, and to keep K46 from associating the food with humans; K80 and K47 are rebuilding their nest for the coming season.

2015 was a better year - K80 and K47 laid two eggs, both hatched, both chicks were banded when they were too young/small for wing tags, so they got colored ID bands as well as the federal bands, and orange 5/R(M) (on right leg)/Mica and orange 5/G(F) (on left leg)/Golwin both fledged successfully. And 2014 juvie K46/Tiana was seen in July 2015, looking healthy and having grown a complete new set of tail feathers. On a personal note, I had the honor of naming 5/G, and chose/invented the name Golwin, for the touch of gold in her wings and the golden winds that will soon help her explore the hills around her nest; the name is also a quiet tribute to the memory of Richard Pitt from the Hancock Forum, my mentor in all things forum, and the Gold Wing motorcycle he loved.

Rattlesnake Canyon bald eagle nest
eaglegal's photo - June 22, 2011

banding day 2015
IWS photo - May 13, 2015
Golwin (back to cam) on banding day

California
Catalina Island
Seal Rocks

no cam

adults K25(M) & K34(F)
2011 - neither adult has tags; may be the same pair but can't be sure

Male K25 was hatched from an egg removed from the West End Nest in 1992 and fostered into the Pinnacle Rock Nest; female K34 was raised at the San Francisco Zoo in 1993 and released on Catalina Island from the Bullrush Hacktower. This pair was allowed to keep their eggs in 2007 (instead of having them removed for incubation), and both hatched - making them the second pair of chicks to hatch naturally without human assistance on Catalina Island since 1945 (Pinnacle Rock was first, a week earlier); female K03 and male K77 both fledged successfully; K77 was last seen on Catalina Island in November 2007, and probably explored neighboring islands until June 2008, when he drowned while trying to fly to the mainland. The pair laid two eggs in 2008; one broke after about 10 days, and the other hatched to become male K62 Gulliver; he fledged successfully, but drowned about 4 months later while trying to fly to the mainland.

2008 was the first year IWS has a cam on this nest; the eagles moved their nest for 2009 so there wasn't a cam in 2009 and won't be a way to have a cam in 2010. They did lay two eggs in 2009, but only one hatched, becoming male K90, who fledged successfully. They laid two eggs in 2010, one of which disappeared after a month or so; the other hatched and fledged successfully as female K05. The pair again laid two eggs in 2011, both hatched successfully, and K07(F)/Karis and K08(M)/Scout fledged successfully; K07's signal hasn't picked up since July 25 (presumed to have left the island or transmitter failed; no visual sightings either), and K08 was still on the island as of mid-August. Another good year at Seal Rocks in 2012 - they laid two eggs, and K20(F)/Pukuu and K21(M)/Micco both fledged successfully. And a repeat for 2013 - both eggs hatched, and K32 (F)/Shasta and K31 (M)/Edge fledged successfully. I like patterns like this - in 2014 they laid two eggs, both hatched, and K40 (F)/Julie and K41 (M)/Kilakila ("majestic") fledged successfully. The pattern continued in 2015 - they laid two eggs, both hatched, and K55(F)/Sammy and K57(F)/Tripina fledged successfully.

Seal Rocks nest
Eagle Guy's photo - February 27, 2009

Seal Rocks nest
nancy's photo - March 21, 2007
This is the general area around the nest, but I'm not sure where exactly the nest is.

another view of Seal Rocks nest
IWS photo - May 13, 2015
Another perspective, from banding day - note adult overhead.

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February and early March, chicks in early April, and fledging from mid-June to early July.

California
Catalina Island
Twin Rocks

no cam

adults K33(M) & K17(F) (through 2011)
Adults K00(M) & K17(F)

Male K33 was hatched from an egg removed from the Seal Rocks Nest in 1992 and fostered back into the Seal Rocks Nest; female K17 was brought from a nest in California as a chick in 1984 and released on Catalina Island from the Bullrush Hacktower. Both of the eggs removed for incubation in 2007 hatched, and the pair successfully raised K75 and K76 (both males). K75 was the only 2007 eaglet still on Catalina Island as of December 5, 2007. In 2008, this pair was allowed to hatch their eggs naturally for the first time. It's not known how many eggs were laid, but two hatched, and males K88 and K89 fledged successfully. K88 was sighted on the mainland August 19 and was seen in southwest Oregon in November 2008 and back on Catalina Island in March 2009; K-89 died around Sept 6 while trying to fly to the mainland. They laid two eggs again in 2009, and successfully fledged males K-96 and K-94. K-96 died while trying to fly to the mainland; as far as we know, K-94 is OK, though he hasn't been seen for a while. The pair laid two eggs in 2010, but stopped incubating a month or so later; not sure if the eggs were still there or if they had broken or otherwise disappeared, but either way, there were no chicks. Sad news again in 2011 - the pair laid two eggs and incubated them well past the anticipated hatch date, but neither hatched; female K17 is the oldest known bald eagle on the islands at 27 years old, so that may be a factor.

It appears that male K00 replaced K33 in 2012. K00 was one of the first two naturally hatched chicks on Catalina Island since 1945 when he and his brother hatched in 2007 at the Pinnacle Rock nest, so it's really exciting to see him back on the island after a bit of wandering, and perhaps settling down. The pair were seen together on and off through the summer, but did not nest in 2012. Maybe next year. K00 and K17 nested in 2013 and laid two eggs, but neither hatched, although they continued incubating the final egg until a month past the expected hatching date; K17 is now 29 years old, and may sadly be past the point where she can produce fertile eggs. The pair laid two eggs again in 2014 and in 2015, and neither one hatched either year. There will be changes for 2016 - Dr. Sharpe reported that K00 was seen at Middle Ranch in the summer of 2015, and K17/Crystal died in fall 2015 while being treated for injuries likely received during a fight with another eagle (she was found 100 meters from the Rattlesnake Canyon nest); she was the oldest bald eagle on the Channel Islands and the last surviving eagle from the 33 eagles released on Catalina from 1980-86 to begin the reintroduction process. It will be interesting to see if a new pair take over this location.

Twin Rocks nest
eaglegal's photo - August 8, 2007
fledgling K75 is the little bump next to the nest

Twin Rocks area
eaglegal's photo - August 1, 2007
This shows the twin rocks that give the area its name. The nest is on the mainland overlooking the rocks - not sure if it's the bump we see on the right or if it's up a little higher.

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February and early March, chicks in early April, and fledging from mid-June to early July.

California
Catalina Island
Two Harbors

Link

adults K81(M) and K82(F)

The male K81 was hatched at the San Francisco Zoo in 1998 and fostered into the West End Nest, while the female K82 hatched from an egg removed from the West End Nest in 1998 and fostered into the Pinnacle Rock Nest; like most of the Catalina adults, they are generally referred to by their wing tag numbers instead of a nickname. They became a breeding pair in 2003, and K82 has laid six eggs from 2004 through 2007, five of which have hatched. Because of problems with DDT pollution which can make the shell of eggs too thin to hatch naturally, eggs from this nest are removed a few days after they are laid, replaced with artificial eggs, and placed in an incubator; when they hatch, the chicks are returned to the nest. This pair raised two eaglets, male K78 ("Sol") and female K79 ("Luna"), from the two eggs they laid in 2007. They laid two eggs in 2008, both of which were removed for incubation; one died shortly before hatching, while the other hatched and was returned to the nest, becoming female K83 ("Star"); she fledged successfully. In 2009, it was decided that there were enough productive nests on Catalina Island that the eggs would not be removed for incubation, and both their eggs hatched naturally! Females "Thunder" and "Lightning" both fledged successfully, and were both still on the island as of October 2009. This pair laid two eggs in 2010, and both hatched, becoming female K04 "Avalon" and male K06 "Gabriel"; both fledged successfully. The eagles laid 2 eggs in 2011; one disappeared after about 3 weeks; the other hatched, K18(F)/Solitaire fledged successfully, and was last seen on the nest October 14, when she was almost 29 weeks old, over 3-1/2 months after she fledged; the adults were still providing food during much of that time - quite unusual as most fledglings leave the nest area within a month or so after fledging. 2012 was a very sad year for this nest and those who watch this eagle family; they laid two eggs, but one broke near hatching time; the second hatched successfully, but when the chick was 3 weeks old, the male left for the night and the female didn't arrive to keep watch; an island fox entered the nest, and the young chick chased it off twice, earning the nickname "Lil Braveheart" - but the fox came a third time while the chick was asleep, and the fox took the chick. 2013 was a better year for this pair - they laid two eggs, one of which broke within 10 days, but the other hatched and K38 (F)/Echo fleded successfully. She was seen near the West End nest in early October, enjoying the bait put out by the IWS crew (see West End for details). The pair laid two eggs in 2014, one of which broke shortly after the second egg was laid; the other hatched, and K 43(F)/Shyla ("Daughter of the Mountain") fledged successfully. The pair again laid two eggs in 2015 - and this time both hatched! - but sadly one of the chicks fell from the nest May 1st, unfortunately on the side with a 300-foot vertical fall; the remaining chick became K58/EmeraldSkye (F)

Two Harbors nest
SoCal Lady's photo - June 24, 2007
©2007 SoCal Lady, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February and early March, chicks in early April, and fledging from mid-June to early July.

California
Catalina Island
West End

Link

adults K01(M) & Wray (F)
adults K51(M) & Wray (F) (brief fling mid-Sept 2010 - mid-Jan 2011)
adults K01(M) & Wray(F) (through fall 2013)
adults K01(M) & K87/Lightning(F) (fall 2013-April 2014)
adults K01(M) & K91/Thunder(F)

This nest, established in 1991, is unusual in that it had three adults for a number of years. The female Dianna (K69) has wing tag on each wing and female Wray (no wing tags,but has a silver leg band) were brought from nests in British Columbia as chicks in 1986 and released together from the Sweetwater Hacktower on Catalina Island. Male K01 (sometimes called "Superman" ) was hatched at the San Francisco Zoo in 2000 and fostered into the Pinnacle Rock Nest; he replaced the previous male who disappeared before the 2006 nesting season at an age of 25. Dianna has not been seen since early in 2008, and there is hope she may have left to form a pair with an unattached male. According to Dr. Sharpe of IWS, Wray and the original male were a pair for a year before Dianna joined them, so she was the junior member of the trio. 22 chicks have fledged from this nest since 1991. Three of the five eggs removed for incubation in 2007 hatched, and the trio successfully raised female K72 ("Earth" ) and males K73 ("Wind" ) and K74 ("Fire" ). One of two eggs removed for incubation in 2008 hatched (though it was out of position for hatching and needed assistance to break out of its shell), and Wray surprised everyone by laying a third egg after the initial two were removed - which actually hatched naturally, although Dr. Sharpe put the chances of an egg from that pair surviving to hatch at less than 5% because of the contamination in the area. Both the incubator chick K65 "Miracle" and the naturally-hatched K67 "Surprise" are female. In 2009, both eggs were left in the nest, both hatched, and K98 "Faith" and K97 "Joy" (both female) fledged successfully, though K98 was found dead in the water 5 weeks later, perhaps while trying to fly to the mainland; K97's transmitter malfunctioned shortly after installation making her hard to track after she left the nest area; she was last seen on the island in late August 2009. The pair laid two eggs in 2010; both hatched and became K08 Dakota and K07 Aquila (both male); K08's transmitter was sending a mortality signal from the mainland shortly after he fledged, though he was never found and it might have been a transmitter malfunction (most eaglets don't try to fly so far so soon); K07 died a month after fledging, apparently drowned while trying to fly to the mainland.

As of January 2, 2011, K01 has not returned to the nest, and a new male K51 is courting Wray. K51 was hatched at the San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and fostered into the Pinnacle Rock Nest, and starting visiting the West End nest in September 2010. Wray at first chased him off, but over time has appeared to accept this young male - though he does need to work on a few technical details if they are to have chicks this year. K01 returned on January 13, and K51 hasn't been seen since then, though he may have returned to the outer islands; K01 was alone on the nest until January 23 when Wray joined him, and they immediately started acting like an established pair. They laid three eggs, all of which hatched; K12(F)/Aahana, K13(M)/Alerio and K14(M)/Prince Harry all fledged successfully, and K12 and K13 were still on the island as of the end of August; K14/Prince Harry's body was found in the water between Santa Cruz and Anacapa on August 30th. Update - K12 was seen in Alberta in October 2011, and in Montana in February 2012 - quite the traveller!

K01 and Wray laid three eggs in 2012, and all hatched successfully. K01 has always been a great provider, but this year there were some spells when he had trouble bringing enough food for his growing family (a sign of a change in the marine life in the area?), and there was intense sibling rivalry at times, with the youngest chick getting the worst beatings and the least food. The youngest chick, nicknamed MeToo, managed to survive, but was so far behind in development that she could not get wing tags or a transmitter when the team arrived to band her siblings, so she got a second leg band, becoming Orange 5Z. She also got her own pile of fish - several forum members contributed fish to be delivered to the nest at banding, and she was tagged first and returned to the nest with its pile of fresh fish while the team processed the two older chicks. K27(F)/Athena, K24(M)/Megwich and 5Z/Ge-nii (MeToo in a native language) all fledged successfully, though K24 sadly drowned several months later, and K27's body was found in Saskatchewan on October; there have been no confirmed sightings of 5Z, but the IWS team has seen a fledgling without wing tags, so perhaps.... 27-year-old Wray and K01 laid 3 eggs in 2013, and K27 (M)/Newton, K29 (F)/Marthe and K28 (F)/Bella all fledged successfully. K28 was rescued from the water about 2 weeks after she fledged, and she and K27 were rescued again the following week; K29 wasn't as lucky - her body was found a week later, on a beach on the mainland. Bait was put out for several weeks in fall 2013 in an attempt to trap Wray, who was observed limping; as far as we know she didn't approach the site (though the team saw her grab a fish, do a poop shot and scratch her head on Oct 1 after the last bait drop, suggesting she was not debilitated, though they didn't see her walk); K28 and K38 from Two Harbors enjoyed the free food.

A non-breeding pair, K87(F)/Lightning (Two Harbors, 2009) and K88(M) (Twin Rocks, 2008) visited the West End nest in fall 2013; as of late October, K88 hasn't been seen for a while, but K87 has been spending time at the nest with K01. We suspect that K01 sent K88 packing - but it's up to Wray to deal with a new female; we are hoping that Wray is just taking a leisurely break from nesting - but are aware that a confrontation between Wray and K87 may have already occurred, and Wray may have lost to the younger eagle. 2014 was a year of transition - Wray was not seen, and K87 appeared to be claiming the nest, though she and K01 did not seem to be bonding well, either physically or in the more illusive sense of appearing to share space comfortably - but K87 was young and K01 was used to a different mate, so we thought perhaps they'd take a year off - when there was another switch in early April - when K87 was challenged by another young female, who turned out to be her older sister K91/Thunder, also hatched at Two Harbors in 2009; there seemed to be more mating between K01 and K91 than there was with K87 - but no eggs this year. However, things are looking promising for 2015!

2015 was a tough year for observers - and I think for IWS staff as well. It started out great - K01 and new mate K91 laid two eggs, and while it took K91 a while to get the idea of incubating, K01 filled in diligently, even incubating at night sometimes, which males don't often do; sadly one egg broke shortly before hatching, with a largely developed chick inside, though Dr. Sharpe said it didn't appear as large as expected, so may have died a few days before the egg broke; happily the second egg hatched successfully, and while the learning continued, K91 developed into a good mother; and then - something that had never happened before - when the chick was gently removed from the nest, she died in Dr. Sharpe's arms; a necropsy showed she had symptoms of acute septicemia (bacterial infection in the blood), which likely caused her death; she didn't get an official name, but was unofficially named Angel.

West End Nest
eaglegal's photo - July 6, 2006

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February and early March, chicks in early April, and fledging from mid-June to early July.

California
San Clemente Island
Bald Canyon

no cam

adults K76(M) & A32(F)

2015 was the first year that chicks were banded here, but the size of the nest suggests it had been used before. K76 is a 2007 chick from Twin Rocks (who visited British Columbia in 2010, before returning to the island)s; he was initially seen on San Clemente in 2014. A32 came from a nest in Alaska as a chick in 2004 and was released from a the North Hacktower; she spent a couple of years (2007-2009) as part of a non-breeding pair in the Thompson Reservoir area now known as Middle Ranch, and was first seeon on San Clemente in 2010. The new pair were seen carrying nesting material in June 2014 - and in 2015, they raised two chicks orange 5/D(M)/Ethan and orange 5/M(F)/Koko.

Bald Canyon Eagle Nest, San Clemente Island, California, courtesy of IWS
IWS photo - June 2014

California
Santa Cruz Island
Baby's Harbor (aka Lady's Harbor)

no cam

adults A68(M)/Braveheart & A27(F)

I initially had some confusion between this nest/territory and Hazards/Cueva Valdez, but think I now have it sorted out. This is another new nesting pair for 2015. A68/Braveheart is one of the 2010 chicks from Pelican Harbor. A27 came from Alaska as a chick in 2004 and was released from the South Hacktower; she was the female at Sauces Canyon from 2010 though 2012, raising 4 chicks during those years, and lost a territorial battle partway through the 2013 season (we all breathed a sign of relief when she was seen 6 weeks later as she had looked very bedraggled the last time she was seen on camera at Sauces); she was seen spending time with A68 at Baby's Harbor in the spring of 2014, and they nested there in 2015 and successfully raised A56(M)/Phoenix.

Baby's Harbor Bald Eagle Nest, Santa Cruz Island, California, courtesy of IWS
IWS photo - April 9, 2014

California
Santa Cruz Island
Fraser Point

no cam

adults A40(M) & possibly A49(F) "Cruz" (2010)
adults A64(M)/Spirit and A49(F)/Cruz

Male A40 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) and female A24 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2004 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) were seen together in the Fraser area in the spring of 2009, and it was hoped they'd develop into a breeding pair. Then in February 2010, A40 was seen with a different female, A49 "Cruz" (hatched in 2006, becoming the first naturally hatched eagle on Santa Cruz in 50 years).

This is potentially a new pair and it's not clear if they're ready to nest yet - though Cruz's mother A26 was only four when she laid the egg that became Cruz. The pair did not nest in 2010 - perhaps in 2011. Did not nest in 2011, and A40 is now the male at the Sauces nest; A49/Cruz was seen near Christy Beach in August 2011.

There was a new pair here in 2012 - A49/Cruz and A64/Spirit! As mentioned above, A49 hatched at the Pelican Harbor nest in 2006 - and A64 hatched at the Pelican Harbor nest in 2008, so they are siblings - but A64 was removed from the island for rehab after being attacked on the nest by a juvie when he was about 6 weeks old. He was brought back to Santa Cruz and released from a hacking tower, but I do wonder if they would have become a pair if he'd been with his parents throught fledging and the month or so afterwards. I've seen speculation that adults can recognize family members by their calls, but A64 may not have learned the family "lingo" before he was taken to rehab. The pair laid at least one egg, and a chick was seen, but sadly did not survive. It's not unusual for a young pair to have their nest fail initially, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed for better luck in 2013.

2013 was a landmark year - A49 and A64 laid two eggs, one hatched, and A89 (F)/Sapphire fledged successfully, becoming the first offspring of wild-fledged eagles to fledge on the Channel Islands since the species disappeared from the Channel Islands in the 1950s and 60s. The pair laid two eggs in 2014, both hatched, and A98(F)/Glory and A97(M)/Maxiwo ('bald eagle' in Chumash) fledged successfully (as a footnote, the number A98 was accidentally also given to A98(F)/Malibu from Pelican Harbor - who is Glory's aunt!). The pair again laid two eggs in 2015, both hatched, and even though the younger was significantly smaller and behind in development, both A54(F)/Chanita and FWS band 709-03074(F)/Takoda fledged successfully. (The second eaglet was too young or undeveloped for wing tags and IWS doesn't have permission to put colored leg bands on eagles in Ventura or Santa Barbara Counties where the northern Channel Islands are located, so it only got the official FWS leg band.)

Big news - this nest may get cams for 2016!

Fraser Point bald eagle nest eagle incubating on Fraser Point nest
Helen of IWS Crew's photos - February 29, 2012

California
Santa Cruz Island
Fry's Harbor

no cam

adults A46(M) "Stephen Jr." & A24(F) (2010-2014)
adults A46(M) "Stephen Jr." & unbanded female

Male A46 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2006 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz) and female A24 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2004 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) were seen together in mid-March 2010; A24 was formerly the mate of A40 at Fraser.

This is a new pair and it's not clear if they're ready to nest yet. This pair also did not nest in 2010. Still together in the area at least some of the time in 2011, but didn't nest. The pair finally nested in 2012; only one egg was seen and they were incubating it as time for a hatch approached, but sadly the next time the nest was checked, the egg was gone and there was no chick. This was their first time nesting, and we hope they'll have better luck in 2013. A46 and A24 were seen together in 2013, and worked on a new nest, but did not lay any eggs - maybe next year. At least one adult was seen in the territory in 2014, but they didn't nest. Sad news at the end of 2014 - A24 was found dead on a beach on Santa Cruz in early October; no additional information was provided. Here's hoping A46 finds a new mate and has a good year in 2015.

A46 was seen with an unbanded female in 2015, and they appeared to be incubating, but the nest subsequently failed; it's not an easy area for viewing, so there are no additional details.

Fry's Harbor bald eagle nest
Kim of IWS Crew's photo - early March 2012

California
Santa Cruz Island
Hazards / Baby's Harbor / Cueva Valdez / North Shore

no cam

adults A00(M) & A16(F)

Male A00 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2002 and released from the North Hacktower, Santa Cruz) and female A16 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2003 and released from the South Hacktower, Santa Cruz) have been a pair since 2007 and may have done some work on a nest, but haven't laid any eggs yet. 2010 was a great year for this pair - they laid at least one egg in a nest at Baby's Harbor, and successfully raised male A72. This pair apparently likes to move around because the built a new nest for 2011, moving from the Cueva Valdez/Baby's Harbor area to Hazards Canyon; they laid at least one egg, and A76(F)/Hutash fledged successfully and was still on the island as of mid-August. In 2013 they laid at least one egg, and the eaglet A83(M) was a healthy feisty chick when banded on June 9, but the IWS team noticed that he looked lethargic when they checked the nest July 5; he looked more active on the 6th, so they stayed away on the 7th to reduce stress on the adults - and when they checked on the 8th, he was on the ground under the nest, weak but alive; they brought him to the mainland for treatment, but it wasn't enough; as is often the case, even though they performed a necropsy, they could not determine a cause of death. The pair moved to a new nest for 2013, and while it was challenging for the crew to observe, we do know they laid at least one egg - and successfully fledged A88 (F)/Aira. The pair again laid at least one egg in 2014, and when the crew checked the nest in May, they found an approximately 6-week-old chick on the ground under the nest; it looked healthy and was being fed and defended by the adults, who had brought down some nesting material, and the crew didn't have gear to climb the tree, so after a quick check, they left it there and returned a week later, banded the chick (no wing tags - the chick was too small) and put her back in the nest; Silver Band (F)/'alow (Chumash for 'White Cloud') fledged successfully. The pair laid at least one egg in 2015, but it or they didn't hatch - hoping for better news in 2016.

Hazards bald eagle nest from a distance
Kim of IWS Crew's photo - March 29, 2011

Hazards bald eagle nest from above
Eagle Guy
's photo - April 6, 2011

California
Santa Cruz Island
Los Piños (aka Willows but didn't nest there)

no cam

adults A45(M) & A51(F) (2009-2014)
adults ?

Male A45 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and released from the North Hacktower, Santa Cruz) and female A51 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2006 and released from the South Hacktower, Santa Cruz) are known as the Willows pair (after the are where they were seen as a non-breeding pair in 2009, 2010 and 2011) - but they moved in 2012, and established what became known as the Los Piños nest. They were seen incubating in late March, but sadly the nest was empty in early April. We wish them better luck in 2013. The pair moved to a new nest in 2013, and laid at least two eggs, though the IWS crew only saw two chicks once (the open countryside around the nest meant they had to observe from quite a distance); A87 (M)/America Strong fledged successfully. The IWS crew believes the same pair nested in 2014, though A45 has lost his wing tags so is harder to identify; they appeared to be incubating for a while, but unfortunately the nest failed.

No one nested here in 2015, and the IWS crew found female A51 at Smuggler's Harbor when they went there to band the chick - but couldn't identify the male, so it could be A45 or it might be A58, who had been the male at Smugglers. It will be interesting to see what happens here in 2016.


IWS Crew's photo - February 2013

California
Santa Cruz Island
Malva Real / Carl Peak / Grasslands / Carl/Maggie

no cam

adults K11(M) & A04(F) (2006-2008)
adults K11(M) & A17(F) (2009-2010)
adults K11(M) ? & A35(F)

The Grasslands nest was established in 2006 by male K11 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2001 and fostered into the West End nest on Catalina Island) and female A04 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2002 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz Island), and is one of the few known bald eagle ground nests in the lower 48 states. They had a successful first year, raising A60, the second chick hatched in the wild on Santa Cruz in 50 years (A49 Cruz at Pelican Harbor was the first), but have not repeated that success. The crew from the Institute for Wildlife Studies (which monitors nests on Catalina and Santa Cruz Islands) found a broken egg in the nest in 2007, and in 2008 two chicks hatched but did not survive. Female A04 also died, most likely of injuries sustained while defending her chicks, probably from another eagle. K11 was later seen with female A17, who was removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2003 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz. They were seen building a nest in a tree in 2009, but did not produce any eggs. They still seem to be a pair, so we'll see what happens next. This pair did lay two eggs in 2010, but the nest failed - only shards were found in the nest a few weeks later. Female A17 was spotted on the mainland according to an update in March 2011; male K11 may have found a new companion (he's been seen with A35), but as far as we know, they didn't nest in 2011. A35 and a male we assume is K11 (he lost his wing bling) laid two eggs in 2012 - and successfully fledged A77(M)/Koa and A78(F)/Aurora. A pair that's likely to be A35 and K11 built a new nest for 2013 and were seen incubating for at least a month, but the crew never saw any chicks. The pair laid at least one egg in 2014, and A91 (F)/Shania ("on my way") fledged successfully; the location and the male's missing wing tags make it hard to know for sure that it's the same pair, or how many eggs or chicks there were. A35 and a male without wing tags who is probably still K11 had at least one chick hatch in 2015, but the nest failed shortly afterwards; the IWS team was only able to visit every other week, so have no details as to what might have happened. We're hoping for better luck in 2016.

Carl Peak bald eagle nest
Don of IWS Crew's photo - February 2012

California
Santa Cruz Island
Pelican Harbor

no cam
in 2011

adults K10(M) & K26(F)

The parents were both hatched in the San Francisco Zoo (male K10 in 2001 and female K26 in 2002) and then fostered into nests on Catalina Island (K10 in the Twin Rocks Nest and K26 in the West End Nest). K26 laid two eggs in 2006 (one hatched, becoming the female A49 "Cruz," the first eagle chick to hatch in the wild on the Channel Islands since 1949; on Santa Rosa as of February 2009); two eggs in 2007 (one hatched, becoming male A63 "Limuw," who died about 7 weeks after fledging while scavenging roadkill in Nevada), and two eggs in 2008 (both hatched, becoming A65 "Skye" and A64 "Spirit" - both male; both were knocked from their nest by a juvenile eagle when they were about 6-1/2 weeks old, taken to the mainland for rehab and released from a hacking tower; Skye drowned after becoming entangled in a kelp bed; Spirit was on Santa Rosa as of February 2009). The pair also had two eggs in 2009; both hatched, but the chicks died shortly after hatching from unknown causes. K10 and K26 are a strong young pair, so we're hoping 2010 will be better. 2010 was indeed a better - the pair laid two eggs, which hatched to become A69 Malik and A68 Braveheart (both male); both fledged successfully. This pair moved to a new nest in 2011 - probably a good thing as their other nest had developed a distinct tilt; they built a nest in the Chinese Harbor area, then abandoned that and built a nest in a hard to reach part of the Twin Harbors area. They'll continue to be known as the Pelican Harbor pair because that was there first nest. They laid at least one egg (it looked like there were might have been two during a helicopter survey of hard-to-see nests but there was only one chick when the team arrived for banding; A74(F)/Karana fledged successfully and was still on the island as of mid-August. We're hoping for a cam on this new nest for 2012. A new cam was installed for 2012, and while one of this pair's two eggs broke after about 4 weeks, we watched the other hatch, and saw male A84/Marcus fledge. The pair apparently moved to a new nest for 2013, or at least were not seen working on any of their known nests; by mid-April they were seen together (so not incubating/brooding), so either they didn't nest or their nest failed. 2014 was better - the pair chose yet another new nest, so no cam, but successfully fledged A92 (M)/Liberty and A98 (F)/Malibu (as a footnote, the number A98 was accidentally also given to A98(F)/Glory from Fraser Point - who is a granddaughter of K10 and K26, and Malibu's niece!). As far as the IWS team could tell, the pair did not nest in 2015. Maybe next year....

Pelican Harbor nest  Pelican Harbor nest
JudyB's s'caps - June 8, 2007 - banding day

Pelican Harbor Nest
LakeMaMa's s'cap - April 23, 2008

new nest for the Pelican Harbor eagles
Don of IWS Crew's photo - May 3, 2011
(new nest in circle on right - adult in circle on left)

Based on past experience, look for eggs in the first half of March, chicks in mid-April, and fledging in late June or early July.

California
Santa Cruz Island
Sauces

Link

adults A28(M) & A27(F) thru 2010
adults A40(M) & A27(F) thru Feb 2013
adults A40(M) & A48(F)

The Sauces pair consisted of male A28 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2004 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) and female A02 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2002 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz). They nested in 2008 and laid at least one egg, but the nest failed. They tried again in 2009, laid eggs, were seen incubating - but were found away from the nest around the time the eggs would have been expected to hatch. Then in July 2009, IWS received a report that A02 was found dead in Pozo, which I think is quite a ways inland on the mainland. It looks as if A28 has paired up with female A27 (also removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2004 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz), and they're working on a nest for the 2010 nesting season. This pair laid two eggs in 2010; only one hatched, and it became male A71, and fledged successfully. There was a bit of a shift in this pair for 2011, and male A28 was replaced by male A40 (produced by San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz; spent time with A24 then with A49 at Fraser before coming to Sauces); the new pair laid two eggs, one of which hatched to become A73(M)/Dreamer, who fledged successfully and was still on the island as of mid-August (the second egg didn't hatch). This pair saw both of their eggs hatch for the first time in 2012, and successfully fledged female A82/Phoebe and male A81/Buster.

2013 was a year of painful change at Sauces - A40 and A27 laid two eggs near the end of February, then appeared to be on alert in early March; observers saw A27 on the nest briefly the morning of March 4th, looking bedraggled and possibly injured; she did not return to the nest again. A40 tended the eggs around the clock for a couple of days, then began taking time away from the nest; he was away for several hours the morning of March 7, and ravens came and took the eggs. A49 (the female at Fraser Point) visited the nest briefly, but by mid-March A48 (F) (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2006 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz) was being seen regularly at Sauces Canyon, with A40. Happily the crew saw A27 near Pelican Harbor in late April, so she has recovered from her likely fight with A48. 2014 may be an interesting year here.

2014 was an unlucky year. The new pair laid at least one egg in mid-February and incubated faithfully for about a week, then stopped tending the nest, suggesting that the egg or eggs had been lost; they did try for a second clutch in mid-March, and within minutes after A48 laid the first egg of that clutch, A40 came in with a big stick, which landed on her just after she turned the egg - and in the confusion, the egg apparently broke, and she didn't lay any more. We're hoping they'll do better in 2015. We think the pair laid two eggs in 2015 (the nest was too deep to see, but A48 appeared to be in labor twice at the usual interval), but the nest failed March 15 when it appeared that the egg had broken; Dr. Sharpe said that from what could be seen, it was likely that the egg was either non-viable, or had stopped developing early in the process; we don't know when the other egg disappeared. They do seem very dedicated, and we're hoping for good news in 2016.

bald eagles at Sauces nest
JudyB's photo - April 10, 2011

California
Santa Cruz Island
Smuggler's Cove

no cam

adults A58(M) & A57(F) (2013-2014)
2015 male? & A51(F)

A57 & A58 (both hatched at the San Francisco Zoo in 2006 and released from hacktowers) have been seen together since 2013 and we thought 2015 was their first year nesting – but the pair was very sensitive to people nearby, so their tags weren't confirmed until banding – when it was discovered that the female was actually A51 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2006 and released from the South Hacktower, Santa Cruz) who had been at Los Piños – and they're not sure who the male is yet, though will try to figure that out. They did lay at least one egg, and A53(F)/Zoe fledged successfully.

Smugglers Cove Bald Eagle Nest, Santa Cruz Island, California, courtesy of IWS
IWS photo - March 2015

California
Santa Cruz Island
Yellowbanks

no cam

adults A21(M) & A11(F) (2008-2010)
adults A21(M) and A48(F) in 2011 (briefly)
adult A48(F) in 2011

Male A21 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2003 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz Island) and female A11 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2002 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz Island) established a territory on the south shore of Santa Cruz Island in 2008.

They were a non-breeding pair in 2009 and 2010, then moved to Anacapa and became the Oak Canyon pair (see above); A21 was seen with A48 at Yellowbanks before settling on Anacapa with A11.

A48 apparently successfully challenged A27 in March 2013 to become the new female at the Sauces Canyon nest; I'm not sure if there's anyone left in the Yellowbanks territory as of October 2013. No additional news in 2014 or 2015.

California
Santa Rosa Island
Lopez

no cam

adults K36(M) & A43(F)
adults A39(M) and A43(F) 2011- 2014
adults A69(M)/Malik and A43(F) beginning in 2011

The nest built by male K36 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2003 and fostered into the Two Harbors nest on Catalina) and female A43 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2005 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz) in the Johnson's Lee area of Santa Rosa Island was discovered by an IWS team in March 2010, and the National Parks Service team on the island reported they appeared to be incubating as of early April. We don't know how many eggs they laid, but one hatched, and was reported as the first known eagle chick to hatch on Santa Rosa in 60 years (but see Trap Canyon below); the chick became female A70, and fledged successfully. Male K36 was replaced by K39 for the 2011 nesting season. This nest was one of the heartbreakers in 2011 - they laid two eggs, one hatched, and then a branch broke, causing the nest to fall to the canyon below; the two-week-old chick died in the fall. We're hoping they rebuild in a safer location in 2012. The pair rebuilt their nest for 2013, and hatched two chicks; one died at 2-3 weeks of age (the remains were found under the nest at banding, so it might have been blown out, or pushed out during sibling rivalry), and female A-79/Kaya-B fledged successfully. K39 and A43 again laid two eggs in 2013, and successfully fledged A85 (F)/La'i and A86 (M)/Azul; sadly A86 was found dead near a beach on the mainland about a month after he fledged. 2014 was a year with a happy surprise - the IWS crew had been able to see a chick in the nest from their distant viewing point, and happily still saw a chick after part of the nest collapsed after heavy rain in early April - but when the arrived to band the chick, they found a second healthy chick on the ground near the base of the tree, doing fine, against all odds; A93(M)/Davy and A94(M)/Connie fledged successfully (the grounded chick A93 was returned to the nest after banding).

The IWS crew had a different sort of surprise on banding day in 2015 - male A39 had been replaced by A69/Malik, who hatched in 2010 at Pelican Harbor and had been seen on San Miguel Island in 2012. The new pair had at least one egg, and observers thought they saw two chicks, but there was only one there on banding day, and A50(M)/Nimoy fledged successfully. (As an aside - I just realized that A69/Malik and his younger brother A68/Braveheart were both successful first-time dads this year as 5-year-olds - perhaps taking after their parents who first nested successfully in 2006 when male K10 was five and female K26 was only four.)

picture of Lopez nest with eagle

California
Santa Rosa Island
Trap Canyon

no cam

adults A08(M) & A22(F)

Male A08 (removed from a nest near Juneau, Alaska, in 2002 and released from the South Hacktower on Santa Cruz) and female A22 (produced by the San Francisco Zoo in 2004 and released from the North Hacktower on Santa Cruz) built a nest on Santa Rosa in 2008, but their eggs didn't hatch; they were collected and found to be infertile. They laid an egg again in 2009, and again it didn't hatch. [It was removed for testing - need to look for results.] We're hoping for better luck in 2010. 2010 was a great year for this pair - they built a new nest, and by the time the nest was found, they had a chick - who became male A67 and was actually the first known chick to hatch on Santa Rosa - once he was discovered; he fledged successfully. This pair laid at least one egg in 2011, but the nest was found to be empty a month later; hopefully they will have better luck in 2012. The pair moved to a different, equally inaccessible nest for 2012 and again raised one chick, who became female A80/Rosa and fledged successfully. In 2013 the pair moved back to a site near the 2010 nest, with no place for the crew to see it well without frightening the birds off the nest; they were able to see a chick, but sadly the nest was empty a month later, except for downy feathers that were all that remained of the chick or chicks. 2014 was better - A95(F)/Ynez and A96(M)/Kanoa fledged successfully. The pair laid at least one egg in 2015 and were seen to be incubating, but either the egg(s) didn't hatch or they lost the chick(s) shortly afterwards. Keeping fingers crossed for 2016.

Trap Canyon nest, banding day 2012
Don of IWS Crew's photos - May 16, 2012
(used with permission - click to read the rest of the story)

California
Humboldt Bay

link

adults Mr. and Mrs. HBE

The Humboldt Bay eagles, known only as Mr. and Mrs. HBE, are approximately 12 years old have been nesting together since 2006. They have successfully raised at least six eaglets. Their nest is about 95-100 feet up in a Douglas Fir, and they've been using it for about 4 years. 2013 was their first year on cam, and they laid two eggs and successfully fledged Kyle (F) and Stormy (F). They again laid two eggs in 2014, and E1(M)/Angel and E2(F)/Mist both fledged successfully, though both chicks were discovered at banding to have what was described as a mild case of avian pox; they were seen on the nest for at least 6 more weeks, and in the area for a bit after that, and seemed to be doing well. The pair laid two eggs in 2015, and Hoolet(F) and Nugget(M) fledged successfully.


cococat9's s'cap - April 25, 2013

California
Turtle Bay
CalTrans

Link

adults Patriot (M) and Liberty (F) thru early 2013
adults Spirit (M) and Liberty (F)

The California Department of Transportation tried to relocate this nest in 2008 because of major highway construction planned for the area, putting a large cone in the nest to keep the eagles from nesting. The eagles had other ideas. People rallied around, and eventually the highway department removed the cone, and the eagle couple - named Patriot (M) and Liberty(F) - successfully fledged two eaglets (named Freedom and Conehead) in 2008, for a total of five eaglets in three years. They laid three eggs in 2009; all hatched, and the three eaglets (named Freedom, Hope and Spirit in a contest sponsored by local media) fledged successfully. They laid three eggs again in 2010, and the eaglets (Peace, Shasta and Justice) fledged successfully. They laid two eggs in 2011, and the eaglets (nicknamed Stormy and Windy) fledged successfully. Patriot and Liberty built a new nest for 2012, so there was no camera, but the great team of ground observers reported that there were two eaglets (nicknamed Shasta and Lassen), both of whom fledged successfully.

2013 was not a good year at Turtle Bay. Patriot and Liberty laid three eggs, one of which collapsed or disappeared within a few weeks. The remaining eggs were left uncovered for hours at a time as the resident pair dealt with an intruder. After a very stressful week, Liberty resumed incubation - but we didn't see Patriot stopping by to take over so she could have a break. To add to the difficulty in viewing, the cam was locked in a position that only showed the eggs and the feet and lower body of the adults - not a great way to tell who is who. Amazingly, both remaining eggs hatched. And sadly both tiny chicks were killed and eaten by a new male who was trying to take over the nest. Because he appeared young, and because he had only shared in the care of the eggs for about a half hour before the second one hatched, he almost certainly didn't have the nesting hormones in place - but it was incredibly hard to watch. And that wasn't the end of the bad news. A couple of months later, Patriot returned, and died while fighting with another eagle near the nest.

As of October 2013, Liberty has chosen a new mate, named Spirit by observers of the cam and others who care about the eagles, and we are hoping for a much better year in 2014. Liberty and her new mate Spirit laid three eggs in 2014, but sadly all three broke within a month or so of being laid; creating fertile eggs takes a bit of skill, and Spirit has been working on that - so I'm hoping for chicks in 2015.

2015 was a great year - they laid three eggs, all three hatched, Spirit was perhaps surprised - but quickly adapted and became a great Dad, and Pi, Paddy and Poppy all fledged successfully!

 
Three Eaglets at the Nest, June 3, 2009
©2009 Donna Sylvester, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early to mid February, hatching in mid March, and fledgling in mid to late June.

Colorado
Fort St. Vrain

Link

There are four cams on this nest, two overhead and the other two looking from the side; the intent is to have one of each online, with the other as backup, but both overhead cams failed early in the nesting season; they streamed both side view cams for a while, but are now down to one sideview cam. They are continuing to try to add sound, but still haven't succeeded at that. The cam is solar-powered, so will be shut down from dusk to dawn to conserve power and might be a bit uncertain on very dark days. There are also photos for the day saved in four-minute increments, so you can see what has happened in the previous 24 hours. The cam is often offline during the fall and winter, and is back online in February.

This nest is at Xcel Energy's Fort St. Vrain Power Station in Platteville, Colorado. Local time is Mountain time. The nest is 6 feet wide and 5 feet deep, and has been active for years. The camera was installed in 2003. This pair successfully raised 3 chicks in 2008, 2 in 2007, 3 in 2006, and 2 in most of the previous years that they've been watched. The nest failed quite tragically in 2009, when their three eggs hatched in late March, but all three chicks died April 17; apparently one of the parents was lost or incapacitated around April 14, and the remaining parent wasn't able to keep the eaglets warm and fed during a bad wind/rain/snow storm; a second adult was seen shortly thereafter, leading to speculation that one of the adults might have eaten a poisoned prairie dog and been unable to function for a few days. It appeared that there was a new female in 2010, possibly a relatively young adult as it looked as if there were a few brown feathers remaining in her head; the male appeared to be the same as last year, though it is hard to tell. Both eagles are banded, but the cam resolution isn't great enough to see numbers on the bands. The pair laid two eggs in 2010, and both chicks fledged successfully. They laid three eggs in 2011, two of which hatched, and both eaglets fledged successfully. 2012 was a very sad year at this nest - they laid three eggs, and all hatched - but one chick got stuck near the edge of the nest when it was 6 days old and died from exposure; the male did arrive during the night to brood the chick while the female brooded the other two at the center of the nest, but it was probably already too late. The remaining chicks died when they were a little over 2 weeks old when the adults were unable to keep them warm and dry during a severe wind/rain storm. We're hoping for a much better year in 2013.

Well, things were slightly better in 2013 - the adults again laid three eggs, and they all hatched. Sadly two of the chicks were lost in mid-April as a result of a large snowstorm, which deposited over a foot of snow on the nest when the chicks were only about two weeks old. The remaining eaglet was renamed "Survivor" by those watching the cam, and fledged successfully. As of November 2013 we're not sure if there will be a cam next year - the nest tree is near the banks of the St. Vrain Creek and is in the area that was flooded in the historic flooding in Colorado from September 10 to September 13. The nest tree is still standing, the nest looks OK and both adults have been seen - but the camera equipment and the solar panels were covered with 5 to 7 feet of water. The weather was still an issue in 2014, but not as severe as the previous year; the pair laid three eggs, all of which hatched; the middle chick ("Argos") died when he/she was a little over a month old, after a week or so of wheezing and difficulty breathing; the other chicks ("Amara" and "Ajax") fledged successfully, though the younger Ajax was observed wheezing occasionally.

2015 was another challenging year here. The pair laid three eggs, and all three hatched, but the youngest D30 died at four days old after ending up outside the nest bowl, perhaps injured or maybe just stuck as the temperature fell, and then there was a bad storm when the remaining chicks were about 3 weeks old, and they didn't both fit under Mom and the one who was more exposed didn't make it (we think the younger, but can't be sure); the remaining chick (nicknamed "Aspen") fledged successfully.

Fort St Vrain nest
tomihawk's photo - July 20, 2007 - from BirdCam Forum

Based on past experience, look for eggs in the first half of March, chicks in mid-April, and fledging in early July.

Florida
Northeast Florida

Link

adults Romeo (M) and Juliet (F)

Gretchen Butler, a volunteer with the Florida Audubon "Eagle Watch" program and the American Eagle Foundation "Eagle Nest Cam" program, has watched these eagles for the past five years, and was the driving force behind the installation of a cam in October 2013, in partnership with the American Eagle Foundation. The nest is 80 feet up in a tall pine tree, the location of which must be kept confidential as a requirement for installation of the cams. The pair has fledged 9 eaglets in the past five years - and we're looking forward to their first year on cam! They have great cams here - and 2014 was a great year; the pair laid two eggs, and NE1/Delilah and NE2/Samson fledged successfully. 2015 was also a good year - they laid two eggs and NE3/Noel and NE4/Nick fledged successfully.


MaryF's screenshot - October 10, 2013
image courtesy of the American Eagle Foundation

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in November, chicks between mid-December and early January, and fledging in late February to mid-March.

Florida
Southwest Florida

Link

adults Ozzie (M) and Harriet (F)

This nest is in Fort Myers, Florida, on the property of Dick Pritchett Real Estate, which installed and operates the cams. The nest is about 60 feet above the ground, in a Slash Pine tree, and the eagles have been nesting there since building the nest in 2006-2007. 2013 was their first year on camera, and they laid two eggs, and eaglets E1/Hope and E/2Honor fledged successfully. 2014 was a challenging year - the pair again laid two eggs and both hatched, but there was serious rivalry when they chicks were 3-4 weeks old, and we feared we might lose the younger one; by 5 weeks old the rivalry had diminished and the younger E4 was catching up in size when observers noticed that older E3 seemed less active, and then stopped eating; E3 died when he/she was almost 6 weeks old, with the cause of death unknown; E4 fledged successfully.

2015 was a year of similarities - and of major change. As in the previous year, there was sibling rivalry, and after a few weeks, the older chick E5 became lethargic and died for no obvious reason. The younger chick E6 thrived - but when s/he was close to fledging, male Ozzie was found injured near a train with a broken clavicle, and went into rehab. It took a couple of days for Harriet to realize that food wasn't going to appear, and then she started providing for E6 - and once E6 fledged, s/he even brought some food in himself. While Ozzie was in rehab, a young male started spending time at the nest - and Harriet went from tolerating his presence to accepting him. When Ozzie was finally released after almost 6 months, Harriet and the young male who came to be known as M15 (male 2015) were not seen, and Ozzie spent some time at a frequent perch, and then flew off, not to be seen for a while. We suspect, but don't know, that he spent some time healing and getting his strength back - and then apparently he tried to get his nest back - and neither Ozzie or M15 were seen for a while. Ozzie surfaced first, injured and caught in a fence near the nest; the homeowners rescued him, and he went back to rehab, but sadly his injuries were too severe and he could not be saved. Rest in peace, noble Ozzie. And then we waited, fearing that M15 had also been lost - but happily he returned a week later, looking strong - and with Harriet's help, is learning to be a good partner. It will be interesting to see what 2016 will bring.


the nest as seen from just outside the Pritchett Real Estate office, September 2012
photo courtesy of Andy Pritchett

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in late November, chicks in early January, and fledging in late March.

Georgia
Berry College

Link

This nest is on the grounds of Berry College in northwestern Georgia. Eagles had been seen in the area - and built a nest in early 2012, though they did not nest. They returned in fall 2012, laid eggs late in the year - and successfully fledged 2 eaglets in April 2013. A camera was installed in the nest tree in fall 2013, along with an "approach" cam which provides a wider view of the tree, and the eagles flying in and out. There was an unexpected challenge here in 2014 - the female was seen to be limping in September 2013 and it was thought that her left leg may have been injured in a territorial fight with another female; in spite of that, she laid two eggs, one of which hatched, and B3 fledged successfully; the female's leg seemed stronger by the end of the nesting season, and I think it looked as if she was moving her toes a bit - so we're hoping for continued improvement in 2015. 2015 was a good year - the female looked stronger, she laid two eggs, both hatched, and B4 and B5 both fledged successfully.


view from the approach cam, December 7, 2013
photo courtesy of Berry College

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in late December, chicks in late January, and fledging in mid to late April.

Illinois
Upper Mississippi River Refuge
Fulton

Link

adults Hope (F), Valor I (M) and Valor II (M)

According to records on the website, the pair has a mixed record. Their nest and eggs were destroyed by high winds in 2004 and 2005; one of the pair died in 2006 after flying into a powerline and the other adult abandoned the nest. A new pair formed and fledged 2 chicks in 2007, 3 in 2008, 1 in 2009, and 3 in 2010. They moved to a new nest in 2011, laid eggs but then abandoned the nest, and that tree blew down in June. They returned to their old nest in 2012 and laid two eggs which subsequently hatched, but the chicks were left alone for long periods of time, and both crawled near the edge and fell from the nest. As of fall 2012, they appear to have moved to a new nest, so they will not be online in 2013. 2013 turned out to be a good year for this nest - the Stewards of the Upper Mississippi River Refuge were able to install a cam that provided a long-distance view of the nest, and reported that two eaglets fledged successfully. There were three adults seen in fall 2012, and on February 21, 2013, when they were incubating there were two adults on the nest and a third adult came and sat next to them - so there may have been a mate exchange - or this nest may be one of the rare three-adult nests. Hopefully they will be able to install a camera nearer the nest for 2014 - but it is a remote location so that may be a challenge. The pair had a new nest in 2014 - no cam and observers were unable to see the nest. They fledged three chicks in 2015- and there is a cam for 2016! The new cam shows this is definitely a cooperative nest with one female and two males, and both males have mated with the female; the group monitoring the nest suspects it's been a 3-eagle nest since 2013, but couldn't confirm that until the 2016 cam went live.

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in early February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in mid-June.

Iowa
Alcoa Davenport

Link

adults Liberty (F) and Justice (M)

According to records on the website, Liberty and Justice built their nest on the Alcoa site in 2009 and fledged 2 eaglets in 2010. A cam was installed for the 2011 nesting season, and the pair fledged one eaglet, named Freedom in a viewer poll. They raised and fledged three eaglets in 2012, named Faith, Hope and Spirit. The pair laid 2 eggs in 2013, and Glory and Honor fledged successfully. The pair laid two eggs in 2014, but one was broken, perhaps when when lots of other eagles were seen in the neighborhood, and an adult may have damaged it defending the nest; the other egg hatched, and the eaglet named Rudy fledged successfully. 2015 was a tough year here - the pair laid two eggs, but the first broke the day after it was laid, and the second egg disappeared shortly before time for hatching (my guess is that it wasn't viable as non-viable eggs seem to collapse around the time we're watching for a hatch); there was bad weather and intruder issues, so it's hard to say what might have happened. We're hoping for better luck in 2016.

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in mid-February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in mid-June.

Iowa
Decorah

Link

This nest was featured on the Nature show "American Eagle" - and now you can watch it live! The nest is in Decorah, Iowa; the exact location is not publicized to protect the eagles. Local time is Central time. The pair has been observed since 2002, but 2009 was its first year online. They successfully raised three eaglets in 2009. This pair laid three eggs in 2010; the first two hatched two days apart - and the third hatched a full week after the first; in spite of the rather impressive difference in size and development between #1 and #3, all three thrived, and fledged successfully. They again laid three eggs and fledged three eaglets in 2011, and one of the fledglings was fitted with a tracking device - you can follow the travels of D1 here. This pair again laid 3 eggs in 2012, and successfully fledged D12, D13 and D14 (official numbering system set up starting with 12, to acknowledge that there are 11 known previous successful fledges from the nest); sadly both D12 and D14 (who got this year's transmitter) died from electrocution after coming to close to wires on electrical poles, D12 a few weeks after fledging, and D14 later in the fall. The eagles are building a new nest as of fall 2012, though still visiting the current nest occasionally. If they use the new nest, there won't be a nest cam in 2013, though one may be added in fall 2013. They did use the new nest in 2013, but thanks to a dedicated local observer, we know they laid at least 3 eggs, and D15, D16 and D17 fledged successfully.

The pair laid three eggs in 2014, and all hatched - and all fledged, though at a fairly young age, perhaps because of flies or gnats bothering them at the nest; unfortunately they had issues after fledging - D18 died after flying into a power line several weeks after fledging; D19 (F) was found in the road by local police a few days after fledging and didn't run when approached by Bob Anderson from the Raptor Resource Project, so he caught her and put her in a holding area overnight and provided lots of food; she was flying well by morning, so he outfitted her with a transmitter (D4 is her tracking designation) and released her near the hatchery with plans to provide supplemental food if necessary, and she and her transmitter were doing fine last time I checked in January 2015; D20 (M) was found with a broken wing a few days after fledging and taken to SOAR for assessment; the wing healed, but with calcification preventing it from moving as needed for flying so he can't be released - but will become an educational eagle at SOAR, where he will be known as Decorah.

2015 was a good year - and a lucky year - for the eagles. They again laid three eggs, all hatched, and D21, D22 and D23 all fledged successfully. Then came not exactly good news - but lucky in the timing - about a month after the last eaglet fledged, there was a severe thunder storm, and the comination of wind and lightning caused the tree to break and the nest came down; all three juvies and one adult were seen the next day, and the second adult was seen a couple of days later, so all survived the high winds - but a number of trees were damaged or blown down by the storm cell, which may make some challenges for the eagles as they rebuild. And there was more sad news for the Decorah family - Bob Anderson, the driving force behind the cams and the Raptor Resource Project that oversees them, passed away in July. I just checked the Raptor Resource Project blog and they built a starter nest new where the old nest came down, and they have pictures of the eagles working on the nest posted on their forum - so here's hoping we'll get to see them in 2016!

Decorah eagle nest
Nora in IA's photo - February 17, 2010
©2010 Nora in IA, used with permission, all rights reserved
"Here is the nest/tree from the bridge that you see east of the cam.  Mom was sitting on the same branch as she was before when I was over there.  The nest is above the stream right where two forks come together and form the one that goes under the bridge."

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in the first half of March, chicks in mid-April, and fledging in early July.

Maine I
Hancock County

Link

The cam is located in coastal Hancock County, and is streaming video with sound. It has infrared for night viewing, although that may be turned off during the off season, and is a pan-tilt-zoom to allow closeups of the chicks when they're small.

The eagles have nested at this site since 1995 and raised 20 offspring, making them one of the most successful pairs in Maine when the cam first came online. They fledged two eaglets on cam in 2006 (a third chick was lost, likely due to sibling rivalry), but had tragedy in 2007 - the weather was brutal right after the chicks hatched and they lost them; they did not lay eggs in 2008 or 2009 (taking a year or two off after a nest failure is apparently fairly common). Eagles were seen at the nest regularly in 2010, though it's not certain if this is the pair from earlier years or if a change occurred at some point since the loss of the chicks in 2007; they did not lay eggs. The current pair actually laid two eggs in 2011, and we all had our hopes up for a successful season - but it was not to be; it's not clear quite what happened, but there was a bad storm shortly after the eggs were laid and the female (who might be relatively young) was gone for several days; when she returned she didn't resume incubating, and the male was unable to do it all, so the nest was eventually left untended and subsequently failed; there may also have been one or more other eagles in the area, adding to the stress. We are hoping - really hard - that they will finally be successful in 2012.

The pair nested in 2012 - and two chicks hatched! Unfortunately the younger one (nicknamed Geddy by the Maine forum) was lost to sibling rivalry when five weeks old in the wake of a major rainstorm; the chicks were alone during much of the storm (unusual for chicks so young), and food deliveries were few and far-between for several days afterwards. The older chick (nicknamed Eden) not only got all the food, but launched a series of brutal attacks on the younger chick, who eventually fell from the nest to his death. Although it appeared to some of us observing the cam that the adults spent less time on the nest than at most nests and the remaining chick had to self-feed more than usual after the storm, the chick fledged successfully. She (or maybe he) was still visiting the nest and occasionally being fed until September 26, roughly 10 weeks after fledging, and some observers were quite certain they heard her calling in the distance well into October. The adults began major work on the nest on September 28.

In a replay of last year, two chicks hatched in 2013, there was some bad weather, followed by a drop in food deliveries, which led to the younger eaglet (nicknamed Moxie by the Maine forum) not being fed; he died when he was six weeks old. There was not the level of attacks that we saw last year, perhaps because the eaglets were a week older than when this happened last year - or perhaps it's a difference in gender or personality. The older eaglet (nicknamed Willow) only attacked the younger one when necessary to make sure the younger one did not get any of the food. Moxie tried to be sneaky, and managed to grab and swallow the tail end of a fish - but it wasn't enough. It again appeared as if Willow was self-feeding much of the time after that, though one of the adults (likely Mom) did stop by occasionally to feed whatever had been delivered or could be found on the nest, which in time included Moxie's body. Willow fledged successfully in early July, and was last seen on the nest on July 31, though the cam was down frequently in August so we may have missed some visits. There were no reported visits in September.

For the third year in a row, the pair had two chicks, known as Big and Little - and this time they made it past 7 weeks before there was any significant rivalry - but the outcome was the same, but perhaps more brutal because Big was old enough to do some self-feeding, and appeared to be trying to kill and eat Little; Big subsequently fledged successfully. The cam was off-line from mid-August until December 30, and went down again 3 days later - so we don't know if there will be a cam for 2015. Well - the cam did not come back online, and in August BRI's spokesperson said they "do not currently have plans to reinstate the webcam program" - so maybe someday - but probably not. He did say that the eagles nested, but his source did not know if any chicks fledged successfully.

Maine nest
Sherri's s'cap - February 21, 2009
(The cam streams in color - this is an infrared shot taken shortly before the cam switched to color for the day; I think it gives a good sense of the nest's location in the tree.)

dinner in the golden hour at the Maine nest
JudyB's s'cap - May 6, 2012

Before 2011, eggs were generally laid in the first half of March, with chicks in mid-April, and fledging in early July; more recently, eggs have arrived in late March, with hatching in early May and fledging in mid-July.

Maine II
Central Maine

Link

The cam is located in central Maine, and according to BioDiversity Research Institute (BRI) the nest has been occupied every year since 2001 (and the territory has been used at least on and off for the last 30 or more years). 2009 was the first year there were cams on the nest. There are two cams, one looking at the nest from the side, and the other over the nest looking in. Both have night vision and constant 15-second refresh views; BRI was hoping to stream from one of the cams, but so far has not had much success with that, and the side view cam apparently failed just before the first egg was laid in 2010.

The pair successfully raised two chicks in 2009. The pair laid two eggs in 2010, and both eaglets fledged successfully. Unfortunately the nest tree fell over during a major wind/rain storm in November 2010; both eagles have been seen since the collapse, and indications are that they are starting a new nest. BRI is hoping to install a cam for the 2011 nesting season if the eagles choose a location where that can be done without disrupting the nest. No cam in 2011; it was reported that the eagles were seen, but it wasn't known if they raised any eaglets. No news since then.

Maine nest
JudyB's s'cap - January 6, 2010

Based on other nests in the general area, look for eggs in the last half of March, chicks towards the end of April, and fledging in late July.

Maine III
(or 2B)
Coastal Maine

Link

The cam is located somewhere Maine, and because it is on private property, BioDiversity Research Institute (BRI) has chosen to not be more specific than to say it's in coastal Maine. The cam has night vision, and appears to have sound, although that seemed to come and go. Note: BRI is calling this Eaglecam2 - which I find confusing as it's a different nest than Maine II, which was also called Eaglecam2.

2011 was the first year for this camera, and it came online in mid-April; one of the adults spent a lot of time sitting on the nest, but we never saw any eggs - don't know if they did have some and lost them, or what the pre-camera story might be. We're hoping to learn more about this pair - and perhaps see some chicks - in 2012. 2012 was another non-productive year at this nest - iIt appears that the male died around the middle of March, electrocuted when he flew into a power line, perhaps while chasing an intruder; a new male was seen on the nest shortly thereafter, with a dark spot on his head and some darker feathers in the tail, but he was quite inexperienced in his attempts to mate (even standing next to the willing female a couple of times while making all the right motions, but nowhere near the target area), so there were no eggs. We're hoping things will be better in 2013. The female looked as if she was getting ready to lay eggs several times in 2013, and spent quite a bit of time looking as if she was incubating - but no eggs were ever seen. Definitely unusual behavior, at least in my experience. The pair was seen occasionally in 2014, but did not nest. In 2015 the cam was online intermittently through April, when it went down for good; the eagles were seen working on the nest, but didn't lay any eggs, and BRI currently has no plans to reinstate their webcam program.

Maine nest
JudyB's s'cap - April 16, 2011

Based on other nests in the general area, look for eggs in the last half of March, chicks towards the end of April, and fledging in late July.

Maine
Sasanoa River

no cam

This is a pair of eagles that nest near me; even though dates will be approximate, I'm adding them to this table for my own reference purposes. Their nest is a bit unique in that it's on an osprey platform on a small island in the Sasanoa River. My normal viewing point is on a bridge about 3/10 of a mile from the nest.

We discovered this nest in 2010, and the pair fledged two chicks that year. We saw one healthy-looking fledgling in 2011 (and can't guarantee that there wasn't a second - the distance combined with our infrequent visits make it hard to be sure), and they again raised one fledgling in 2012. We occasionally saw eagles in the area in 2013, but they didn't nest on the platform, and we don't know if they nested elsewhere or if they took a year off. They were back in 2014, and again raised one fledgling. 2015 was a sad year - it looked as if they had eggs by the end of March (probably earlier), and it looked as if they were feeding a chick on April 19 - but the next few days were cold with lots and lots of rain - and when I visited on the 26th, both adults were perched on the side of the nest, but they were not brooding, and made no move to cover the nest when it began to rain again, so I think their chick(s) fell victim to the cold wet weather. As of December 2015, the eagles are around (they don't migrate), so I'm hoping for a better year in 2016.

sasanoa eagle nest  sasanoa eagle nest

sasanoa eagle nest
JudyB's photos - the closer shots are from 2010 and the view from the bridge is from 2014

Based on other nests in the general area, look for eggs in the last half of March, chicks towards the end of April, and fledging in late July.

Maryland
Blackwater Refuge

Link

The camera has frequently updating still shots, and uses infrared technology to provide "night vision." It is generally offline once the fledglings leave until midwinter. It is also turned off from 11 pm - 3 am to reduce bandwidth expenses.

The nest is located about 80 feet up in the air in a tree in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge on Maryland's Eastern Shore. This is one of the first nests to have a camera, and has been online since 2005. The pair has successfully raised three chicks in 2005 and two in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. They laid three eggs in 2011; all hatched and all three fledged successfully. 2012 was a very sad year at this nest; the pair laid two eggs which hatched successfully, but left the chicks alone more than usual, perhaps because food was scarce or because there were intruders in the area, and an adult eagle landed at the nest and attacked the 8-day-old eaglets while the adults were off the nest, killing the older one and fatally injuring the younger one. A new cam has been installed for 2013 - still transmitting as a refresh cam, but higher resolution - and we are hoping for a much happier year. The pair laid 3 eggs in 2013 and all hatched - but the third hatched 5 days after the second, and its smaller size combined with a bad storm may have set up a situation where it couldn't successfully compete for food, even though food was plentiful, and it died when about 5 days old; the two remaining chicks, named Talon and Soar, fledged successfully. The pair again laid three eggs in 2014; only two of them hatched, and Glider and Chaser fledged successfully.

2015 was a strange and ultimately sad year here; the pair laid three eggs, two of them hatched; all looked normal - and then the healthy-looking younger one died for no obvious reason when he or she was about 4 days old; the older chick continued to thrive - but when she or he was 2 weeks old, she was exploring the nest, and as it began to get cooler, the adult focused on incubating the remaining egg, rather than brooding the chick or trying to get her back to the nest - and the chick died, probably from hypothermia. We hadn't seen anything to suggest that one or both adults were new - but that seems very unusual behavior for an experienced pair. We're hoping for a much better year in 2016.

Blackwater nest Blackwater nest
(photo of tree climber from Friends of Blackwater Eagle Web Log, all rights reserved;
closeup of nest © 2007 Paula Compton, used with permission, all rights reserved)

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid to late January, chicks in late February to early March, and fledging in mid to late May.  

Massachusetts
Barton's Cove

Link

Barton Island is a small island in the Connecticut River, near Barton Cove, in Gill, Massachusetts. A female eagle originally raised and released at the nearby Quabbin Reservoir in 1985 paired with a male bird released in 1986, forming the Barton Island territory in 1989. The original male was subsequently replaced (in 1996?) by a male with leg bands indicating it came from New York State. The nest has produced one or two chicks most years since 1989, although there were three years that the pair was unsuccessful (1997, 1999 and 2001). They fledged two chicks in 2002, one in 2003, two in 2004, one in 2005, two in 2006 and 2007, and one in 2008.

The nest tree below collapsed at the end of the 2008 nesting season (eaglet and parents were fine).

Barton's Cove eaglets
July 26, 2007 - 2 fledglings
© 2007 Sharon Feeney, used with permission, all rights reserved

They are now nesting in a red oak nearby, but they established their nest too late for a camera to be added for the 2009 nesting season. As far as we know, they didn't actually raise any eaglets in 2009 - though the nest is a long way from the nearest vantage point. The utility tried to get the cam operational for 2010, but they had a very small window to visit the island and the weather didn't cooperate; local observers reported that they did have one or more chicks, and a visit to band the chick(s) determined that there was one healthy chick and the remains of a second chick. We hoped there would be a cam in 2011 but that didn't happen; a local photographer reported that there were two chicks, both of which fledged successfully. There were no reports in 2012. The photographer saw three chicks in the nest in 2013, and later saw all three perched near the nest so all fledged successfully. Still no cam for 2014, but the local photographer saw three chicks fledge successfully. And in 2015, he reported that only two eaglets were seen, and both fledged successfully.

February 14, 2009 - new nest (at far right above the white birch)
© 2009 Sherri Delaney, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early March, chicks in early to mid-April, and fledging in early July.

Minnesota
MN Bound

Link

2012 was the first year I became aware of this cam, although MN Bound did place a cam at different location attempting to view the nest last year; I haven't seen any reports on the success of the nest in 2011. The folks running the cam believe there was a new male in 2012, probably young as he had a black spot on his head, and initially had a band on one leg, though that apparently fell off (the spot remained constant). The pair laid two eggs, but sadly the younger eaglet (named Kirby) fell from the nest when he was 16 days old and did not survive; it appeared that he was standing on one end of a piece of skin, and when the adult moved the skin, he was tossed up to the edge of the nest.

The older eaglet, named Harmon, became stuck in the nest when he was a little over 3 weeks old; he was removed from the nest the afternoon of May 4 and taken to rehab to be cleaned and checked out (there were some puncture wounds (from sticks in the nest?) - and maggots), and fed; there were no serious injuries, so he was returned to the nest the afternoon of May 6, along with a supply of fish heads and tails. He was alone that night, and as a second night approached, the team made plans to remove him - when the adults suddenly appeared on the nest. The reunion was amazing - I've been watching eagles for a long time - and seeing both adults trying to feed him at the same time, and then Mom preening him - it was one of the most touching scenes I've ever witnessed.

2013 was a more peaceful year; the adults laid two eggs, and Harmony and Peace fledged successfully. The pair laid three eggs in 2014, a first since we've been watching, and all three hatched but sadly the youngest Skye died after a week, probably after getting chilled by a night of heavy rain; Arky and Dakota fledged successfully. There were just two eggs in 2015, both hatched, and Spirit and Scout fledged successfully, though we're not quite sure when because of cam issues.

Based past experience for this pair, look for eggs in early March, chicks in mid-April, and fledging in late June or early July.

Minnesota
DNR
Minn-StPaul

Link

2013 was the first year on cam for this nest, and the first eagle cam for the sponsoring Department of Natural Resources. Eagles in Minnesota typically lay eggs in March, but this pair laid three eggs around the beginning of January. Not surprising, considering how cold it is in Minnesota at that time of year, none hatched. One broke or collapsed February 25; the second broke and then crumbled on March 4; the third egg broke the morning of April 5; none appeared to have much if any content; the adults were tending the egg until the end (about 90 days). I wasn't watching so don't know if they were still incubating constantly or taking breaks towards the end.

In 2014 the pair again laid three eggs, this time waiting until mid-February; they went through some heavy snow while incubating, but all three hatched! Unfortunately, when the oldest chick was about 5 weeks old, viewers realized that he or she seemed to be stuck; DNR initially restated their non-intervention policy, but after further discussion with the relevant authorities, removed the chick from the nest; they reported s/he had a serious injury to the elbow on the right wing, possible injury to the right leg, and systemic infection; after additional tests and counsultation, the Raptor Center reported that the severe injury to its elbow with bone loss resulting in a lack of integrity to the elbow joint made it impossible for the eaglet to survive in the wild, and that type of injury is likely to cause ongoing discomfort, so the eaglet was humanely euthanized. The two remaining chicks fledged successfully.

The pair laid three eggs in 2015, starting in mid-January this time; all three hatched, but #2 appeared to come out of the side of the egg, rather than pecking around the circumference and pushing the two parts apart; we saw a pip in the second egg the morning of February 27, and it looked as if the chick was close to getting out of the shell as it got dark on March 1st - which is around 2-1/2 days, while most hatches take 36 hours or less. #3 hatched quickly and normally and was doing well initially (I thought better than #2, who seemed exhausted by the ordeal of hatching) - but the third day after the two younger ones hatched was very cold with few feedings (too cold to uncover the chicks for more than a few minutes at a time and the food on the nest was frozen solid), and by the next morning #3 was weak and was poorly positioned during the first feeding, and too week to push to the front for the second, and died later that morning; the remaining chicks fledged successfully.

Based past experience for this pair and what's normal in the area, I don't know when they might lay their next eggs.

Missouri
Lake of the Ozarks

This cam, showing "Elsie & Einstein," the Lake of the Ozarks Eagles is located in Central Missouri. The pair built their first nest in that location in fall 2009 and hatched 2 eaglets in 2010, of which only one survived into the early summer. In 2011 they built another nest nearby, fortunately also within cam reach, and again hatched two eaglets, only one of which survived to fledge (we think the other fell from the nest during a very windy storm). The pair laid three eggs in 2012 - and all hatched and fledged! The nest was almost non-existent by the the time the chicks fledged, and was in a dead tree, so the cam owner built a large platform in the tree with the cam, and it looks as if the eagles will be nesting there for 2013. The pair laid two eggs in 2013, and Ozark and Star fledged successfully. The cam didn't look into the nest bowl in 2014, so we don't know how many eggs were laid; some viewers thought they caught a glimpse of a chick 41 days after they started incubating, but there were no further sightings. We're hoping for better luck for the pair in 2015.

No streaming camera in 2015, but pictures and videos were posted on the internet; the pair had three chicks but lost the youngest (Puddles) a few days after hatching; Jessie and Bo fledged successfully.

Lake of the Ozarks bald eagles
Tweet Dreams's s'cap - February 9, 2011

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid February, chicks in late March, and fledging in mid June.

Montana
Clark Fork River

no cam

This nest on the Clark Fork River near Missoula, Montana, came to our attention in 2011, when local observer Sue Erickson reported that they were raising four chicks! She said that multiple chicks were the norm (they raised 2 in 2007, 3 in 2008 and 2009, then 2 in 2010) - but raising four is very unusual - and all four fledged successfully. They raised three chicks in 2012. No info reported since 2012.

4 eaglets in the Clark Fork River nest
Sue Erickson's photo - May 12, 2011
©2011 Sue Erickson, permission requested, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early March, chicks in early to mid-April, and fledging in mid July.

Montana
Libby Dam

Link

Libby Dam is located on the on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana. The nest, also known as the Souse Gulch Eagle Nest, was established in 1996, with the first eggs in 1997. From 1997 through 2008, the pair fledged 21 eaglets, including two in 2007 and two in 2008. They laid two eggs in 2009 and both hatched, but the younger chick died when it was almost 3 weeks old (not easy to guess why on a refresh cam); the older chick fledged successfully. The pair laid two eggs in 2010; only one hatched, and we believe it fledged successfully; the chick was not seen at the nest after fledging, but the adults were only seen once or twice in the two weeks before the cam was turned off, leading us to believe/hope that they and the chick were based somewhere nearer the water. In 2011 they again laid two eggs, one of which hatched and fledged successfully; the chick was seen returning to the nest for a week or so, after which the cam went down. We know that two eggs hatched in 2012, but the cam was down for a couple of weeks right after they hatched, and there was only one chick when it came back up; it went down for god shortly thereafter - the remaining chick was looking great, but we don't actually know if she fledged. We do have good news for 2013 - the Army Corps of Engineers, which runs the cam, has announced that they're installing a new cam for the upcoming nesting season. Well, the hoped-for camera hasn't appeared yet - but the ranger at the site reported that there were two chicks in 2013, and both fledged successfully. Still no cam online for 2014, but the ranger reported that they had two chicks and both fledged successfully. The pair did not use their nest in 2015, and rangers on site didn't notice another nest but also didn't actively look for one.


JudyB's s'cap - June 20, 2008

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid to late March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid July.

New Jersey
Duke Farms

Link

This nest has streaming video, with a good view of the nest, though the focus is a little fuzzy.

"Duke Farms is a 2,700-acre estate in Hillsborough, New Jersey, and is owned and supported by the Duke Farms Foundation. The mission of Duke Farms is to be a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land. This Eagle Cam was installed to provide researchers with an opportunity to monitor a pair of nesting Bald Eagles without any disturbance to the birds. It is being shared with the public to provide viewers with a glimpse of wildlife in its natural environment." (© 2009 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. All rights reserved.)

2009 was the first year we watched this pair, and the site doesn't provide any history on them. They successfully raised and fledged three chicks in 2009, with both parents sometimes feeding at the same time from different areas of the nest, making it easier for the smallest to get a share. They laid two eggs in 2010, and both chicks fledged successfully. They laid 3 eggs in 2011; 2 hatched and both chicks fledged successfully. The cam was offline for the 2012 nesting season; a biologist with a spotting scope reported seeing a chick, and reported it fledged successfully; given the challenges involved in occasional, long-distance observation, I think it's not certain that there was only one chick. A new cam was installed for 2013, providing a side view of the nest; at least 2 eggs were laid, and two eaglets fledged successfully; there was some excitement at the nest this year - a hawk landed on the nest the day before the eggs hatched - while one of the adults was incubating. There was a brief, very fierce battle, and the adult killed the hawk - and we all held our collective breath until we saw the chicks, because the cam view didn't let us see if the eggs were damaged during the fight.

The pair laid three eggs in 2014; the cam went down shortly before the chicks were expected to fledge - we believe all three fledged successfully, but have no additional details. There were two eggs in 2015, and both chicks fledged successfully.

Duke Farms eaglets, April 2009
JudyB's s'cap - April 21, 2009

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late February, chicks in early April, and fledging in late June or early July.

North Carolina
Carolina Raptor Center

Link

adults Derek(M) and Savannah(F)

This nest has a refresh cam that refreshes every five seconds; it's only on during daylight hours. CRC is hoping to install an upgraded camera for the 2012 nesting season, with streaming video and possibly sound.

Derek and Savannah are non-releasable eagles who have been at the Carolina Raptor Center since 1998. They became a pair, and she laid her first eggs in 2004. They didn't hatch, but in 2006 two eggs hatched; the eaglets were taken to a hacking tower when they were 6 weeks old and subsequently fledged; they have GPS units and can be tracked at the Carolina Raptor Center Eagle Tracking Project. They had one egg hatch in 2008, and that chick was also successfully fledged from a hacking tower. No eggs hatched in 2009; they think the unusually cold weather was responsible, and responded by insulating the pair's preferred nestbox (which is on the ground). They laid three eggs in 2010; the first egg hatched and the chick is looking good; the second hatched but the chick was not strong enough to survive, and the third failed before hatching. There are five other adult eagles at CRC, and I think most of them share the enclosure with Derek and Savannah, though they know better than to come close to the nest. The 2010 eaglet, a female named Noah, was equipped with a transmitter, and she was tracked after fledging to a wilderness area in Virginia, where her signal was lost; the eaglet and the transmitter were not found, so we're hoping it's an equipment malfunction, and she'll reappear in time. The pair laid two eggs in 2011 and both hatched successfully, but sadly the younger eaglet (who had seemed smaller and weaker) died when he/she was 26 days; a necropsy was conducted but didn't determine a cause of death; the older eaglet, named Kinsey, was moved to a hacking tower with two somewhat older eaglets who had been rescued after their nest collapsed; we think being with older eaglets encouraged Kinsey to "branch" on the perches in the tower at a fairly young age, and she fledged successfully, not long after her older tower-mates. Derek and Savannah laid 2 eggs in 2012, one of which hatched; that eaglet, a female named Carolina, fledged successfully from the hacking tower - and in a switch from the previous year, once she was flying well, the staff built a shelf for her food outside the tower so they could close the doors and bring in two younger rescued eaglets who were close to fledging; they also fledged successfully, though the younger one seemed a bit intimidated by his older companion at first.

2013 was a sad year for those of us following these eagles. They laid three eggs but removed one (perhaps cracked or broken) before hatch time and another didn't hatch, so they only had one chick - and it was killed by a predator when it was about 3-1/2 weeks old; the initial reports said they couldn't identify the type of predator, or how it gained access, though they were certain it was not one of the other eagles in the aviary; later reports said it was probably a raccoon, and while they had every sort of barrier they could think of to keep the eagles in and everything else out, raccoons are very clever - and they reported that a raccoon was seen inside the aviary at night a few times in the months after the eaglet was killed, and had eluded all attempts to trap it. They removed the eagles for a time, and are installing an additional protective fence inside the aviary, so we're hoping all will go well in 2014. Unfortunately there were no chicks in 2014 - they laid two eggs; one was broken partway through the incubation period and the other failed to hatch. The pair laid three eggs in 2015 (actually in late 2014 - first egg was December 4, 4-6 weeks earlier than they'd ever laid before) but none hatched; one apparently broke shortly after the window for a hatch and the others were removed for testing and proved to be non-viable, perhaps because they did not mate successfully, or because they are getting older. Keeping fingers crossed for 2016.

Carolina Raptor Center eagles 2010
JudyB's s'cap - February 15, 2010

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early January and chicks in mid-February; chicks will likely be moved to a hacking tower around the end of March and should fledge from there in mid-May.

North Carolina
Jordan Lake

Link

adults Derek (M) and Savannah (F)

The cam is available dawn to dusk and it requires QuickTime to function properly. It provides a still picture view that refreshes automatically.

This nest is located in central North Carolina, near the urban areas of Raleigh-Durham and Chapel Hill. It's northeast of Charlotte, where the Carolina Raptor Center is located, and looks to be about half-way between Charlotte and Norfolk, Virginia. The Jordan Lake EagleCam is a collaboration between North Carolina State University and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wilmington District. The goal of the project is to "stimulate interest in Bald Eagles by letting people in the triangle know that these magnificent birds are now nesting right in their backyards." The nest is situated in an area that provides many large trees suitable for nesting bald eagles with close proximity to lakes and rivers that provide a good food source!

This pair successfully fledged young in the three years before a cam was added in 2011, and successfully fledged two eaglets in 2011. The pair laid 2 eggs in 2012, and while the cam went down partway through the nesting season, a local photographer reported that both fledged successfully. They are working to develop a more stable cam for 2013. The pair laid 2 eggs in 2013; one hatched and the eaglet fledged successfully. 2014 was a sad year at Jordan Lake - the pair laid two eggs and both hatched, but there was a bad rainstorm when the chicks were about 6 weeks old and part of the nest collapsed, and both chicks fell from the nest. One died from the fall, and the other was rescued and taken to the Carolina Raptor Center for treatment of an abrasion under one wing and a broken leg; the chick's condition got worse and another round of tests found a hairline fracture on a wing that had become an open fracture and could not be repaired, so the little one was humanely euthanized. Rest in peace, little ones.

The eagles did not rebuild in that location, so there was a cam in 2015, but it was a more general wildlife cam, showcasing the various species that visit the area, including eagles.

Carolina Raptor Center eagles 2010
October 2010
Thanks to NC State University and US Army Corps of Engineers

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early December, chicks in mid-January, and fledging in late March/early April.

Oklahoma
Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge

Link

The nest is in the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, near Vian in eastern Oklahoma, near the Arkansas border. This is the Sutton Center's second nest with a cam (their first features a pair that nests about 125 miles away, at Sooner Lake in north central Oklahoma). Their primary cam page shows two views of Sooner Lake and two of Sequoyah.

The pair laid three eggs in 2011, the first year with a cam, though one disappeared before the cam came online. The two remaining eggs hatched, and both chicks fledged successfully; the younger was given a GPS transmitter, and you can follow his travels here. The pair again laid three eggs in 2012, and all three hatched, but the youngest chick was significantly smaller and fell behind in development, probably because food was a bit scarce; he was holding his own, and usually getting some food - but sadly died, probably of exposure, when he was about 5 weeks old - there was a heavy rainstorm, and his older siblings had feathers to help protect themselves from the cold rain, and he still had mostly down. The pair has laid two eggs to start the 2013 nesting season, so we are hoping both hatch and thrive.

Well, 2013 was an unusual, and ultimately non-productive nesting season here. There appeared to be an intruder or intruders who disrupted the nesting starting about 3 weeks into the incubation period; adults were off the eggs 30-60 minutes initially, and eventually only incubated for a couple of hours per day; they eventually resumed incubation, but the eggs had been uncovered in freezing weather for hours at a time, and often uncovered overnight, so sadly there wais no realistic chance the eggs will hatch. One egg collapsed January 30 (52 or 49 days after laying) and the adults were last seen on the nest February 2 (and incubated the remaining egg for a while that day). Then a great horned owl started visiting on February 3, appeared to incubate the eagle egg during the night Feb 4 & 5, spent the day on the nest Feb 6 - and laid an egg Feb 7! She laid a second egg two days later, and incubated them and the remaining eagle egg. The eagle egg and one owl egg disappeared overnight Feb 15-16; the second owl egg and the owl were gone when cam came online the morning of Feb 26; as of Feb 28, the owl had not been seen, though there would be no reason for her to return to the nest if she lost the egg. The eagles have not been seen since Feb 2; both owls visited the nest the morning of March 3rd, and one was on the nest as it got dark that evening, though there's no IR, so she(?) may have left as darkness fell. A pair of osprey also visted the nest later in the spring - busy nest!

No one used the nest in 2014 - though a local observer believes the pair had a successful season, though it wasn't clear which alternate nest was theirs, so we don't know how many chicks they raised.
2015 was a sad year - we think there may have been a new pair (chatters felt the female did not look like the one from previous years, and the male seemed very tentative the first few times he tried to incubate their two eggs); I focused on other nests once the eggs were laid and things looked OK, but when I checked back after a couple of weeks, it appeared that only the female was incubating the eggs; the male was in the area, and would come to the nest some of the time when the female left, but we didn't see him bring food or tend to the eggs, which were left uncovered (often for long periods of time, given the chilly weather) while the female was off getting food.. Against all odds, the first egg began hatching but couldn't complete the hatch process and was removed from cam view by the male; it looked as if there was a pip in the second egg, and I'm hoping the hatch process had stopped before the female abandoned the nest. I know new/young pairs often don't get all the necessary skills in the right sequence initially, so am hoping for a better year in 2016.
Rest in peace, little almost-chicks.

Sequoyah nest - February 2011 Sequoyah nest - October 2011
JudyB's s'caps - Feb 10, 2011, and Oct 11, 2011

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late December/early January, chicks in early February, and fledging in mid April.

Oklahoma
Sooner Lake

Link

This nest has streaming video with one cam mounted above the nest, and the other at a distance looking up at the nest in its tree.

The nest is on Sooner Lake, near Stillwater in north-central Oklahoma. This pair's former nest was on an artificial tower erected by the Sutton Avian Research Center and local utility OG&E to replace the original dead nest tree used by this pair after it fell down. The pair first built a nest in the dead tree in 1995, and laid their first eggs in 1996. Since then, they've fledged 24 eaglets, with three eaglets in 2000 and 2002. 2008 was the first year they've known how many eggs were laid; they do know that three eggs hatched in 2007, but the youngest chick was unable to compete for food with its older siblings, so only two of them fledged. There was an unusual clutch of four eggs laid in 2008, but the cam was down for a month shortly after they started to hatch, so we don't know how many of them hatched; there were two eaglets when the cam came back, and both fledged successfully. They laid three eggs in 2009, but only one hatched; the eaglet fledged successfully. In 2010 the pair did some preliminary work on two alternative nests, eventually choosing one in a tree near the lake. This proved to be a bad choice; they laid three eggs, two of which hatched; the younger chick died two days after hatching when it was blown across the nest in heavy winds and slipped through a hole in the edge; the older chick died when it was a little over a month old, most likely by losing its balance as it learned to stand upright, and slipping over the edge. As far as we know, they didn't nest in 2011; they are still seen at the platform in the lake, so we're hoping they may nest in 2012. The pair again nested in the dead tree in 2012, and laid three eggs, two of which hatched; the older one died when it was about a week old, possibly after being stepped on by one of the adults; the remaining chick fledged successfully. The dead tree blew over in mid-December, happily at a time when there were no eggs or chicks present, and the adults appear to be turning their attention to the artificial nest they used before. The pair used the artificial nest in 2013, and had laid 4 eggs by the time the cam was streaming there; all hatched, but the fourth died shortly after hatching, and while the 3rd was only 2 days younger than the others, there was some fairly intense rivalry and some very cold weather, and he died less than a week after hatching; the other two fledged successfully.

The pair used an alternate nest in 2014, and Chat member "nesty" reported that they fledged two eaglets.
2015 was another unusual year - a local observer said it looked as if the pair was using an alternate nest as of mid-February (and I'm not sure how that worked out), and then someone laid an egg on the platform nest on March 26 (over a month after eggs are usually laid), though there was only a minimal amount of incubating before it was abandoned; folks at the Sutton Center said that there was a failed nest attempt attempt about a mile away earlier in the spring, and that pair might have been starting a second clutch, but didn't carry through because of the lateness of the season. They said the egg might also have been laid by a young female not yet ready to complete a nesting season. It is amazing what we are learning from these cams!

Sooner Lake 2009 nest Sooner Lake 2010 nest
JudyB's s'caps - earlier nest June 30, 2009 and current nest March 9, 2010

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early February, chicks in mid March, and fledging in late May or early June.

Oregon
Deschutes

Link

This is a streaming cam with a 3-minute limit; there's a brief intro before you get to the cam.

This is a streaming cam with a 3-minute limit; there's a brief intro before you get to the cam. The cam is located in Willamette Pass in Deschutes National Forest in central Oregon. The Deschutes National Forest Bald Eagle Cam is provided by the Oregon Zoo, AT&T, the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation, and the USDA Forest Service's NatureWatch Program. The area was first identified as an occupied territory in 1974, and has been successful in producing fledglings in 21 of the years since then. They raised one chick in 2006, and had early nest failures in 2007 and 2008. They laid one egg in 2009 (I don't actually remember any other pairs that laid only one egg in a nesting season), and it hatched, and the eaglet fledged; the eaglet (named Pengra Cescent) did not return to the nest after fledging, but two adults and a juvie were seen flying in the area a few days later, so we're optimistically assuming it was Pengra and her parents. The pair laid two eggs in 2010, but there was a series of heavy snowstorms during the incubation period, and while they made an amazing effort to keep the eggs warm and dry, the eggs did not hatch. 2011 was a very snowy year, and as far as we know the eagles did not nest, though they were seen in the territory. They also did not nest in 2012, as far as we know, and we haven't had any additional updates or seen activity at the nest.

Deschutes Nest
Marcia's s'cap - July 25, 2008

Picture of Deschutes nest from January 2010 camera installation
Thanks to the USDA Forest Service for making this copyright-free picture of the nest
taken January 2010 during camera installation available for non-commercial use.

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid-April, chicks in late May, and fledging in mid to late August.

Pennsylvania Codorus State Park
Hanover

Link

adults Freedom (M) and Liberty (F)

The Pennsylvania Game Commission apparently had a trial webcam on a different nest, then moved here for the 2015 nesting season. The cam is a bit north and a ways inland from the Blackwater nest in Maryland - but may be close enough to Chesapeake Bay to be an early nest. The initial press release didn't provide any background on the eagles - so we have much to learn here!

2015 was a good year here - the pair laid two eggs, and in spite of enough snow that we had trouble telling which bump was the incubating female, both hatched and fledged successfully.

cam being installed at hanover pa eagle nest
© Pennsylvania Game Commission, all rights reserved

Based on one year's experience, look for eggs in mid-February, chicks in late March, and fledging in mid June.

Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Hays

Link

Hays is a neighborhood in Pittsburgh, and lies southeast of the center of Pittsburgh along the Monongahela River. The nest is on a steep, wooded hillside overlooking the river. The pair reared one young chick in 2013, which was the first successful eagle nesting in the city in more than 200 years, according to game commission officials. The pair successfully raised three chicks (H2, H3 and H4) in 2014. The pair only laid two eggs in 2015, and neither of them hatched; one broke at about 3-1/2 weeks and the other collapsed at around 5 weeks - neither was viable. There was some miserable weather early in the incubation period which might have been a factor - host PixController reported that they received a very interesting message from one of their Facebook fans Susan Shearer. This was her message: "Wanted to give you some info I got from the Raptor Education Center that may be the reason the eggs failed...On Feb. 24th mom stood up and steam came off the nest ..after that the color of the eggs changed ...out of concern I messaged the Raptor center sent them pics of the eggs before the incident and after ..also sent them video of the steam coming off..they had concerns that there was too much moisture and that could cause bacteria that would harm the eggs being they were just a few days old...This makes sense to me." Hoping for a better year in 2016.

pittsburgh hays bald eagle nest
© Pix Controller, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid-February, chicks in late March, and fledging in mid to late June.

Tennessee
Harrison Bay

Link

Adults Elliott (M) and Eloise (F)

According to records on the Harrison Bay Eagle Cam site, the nest is on the edge of a golf course, and is near the top of a 75-foot tall pine tree. The site also notes that the pair first nested in 2011, producing eaglets HB1 and HB2. They laid two eggs in 2012 and at least one hatched, but neither chick survived the hatching process. There was a camera in 2012, but I'm not sure if it was streamed to the web. 2013 was the first year I was aware of the cam, and Eloise and Elliott laid two eggs, and HB3 and HB4 fledged successfully.

The pair laid 2 eggs in 2014, and HB5 and HB6 fledged successfully - but HB5 had a bit of a detour on the way; he or she may have had an accidental fledge on May 26 when only 72 days old, and made it back to the nest, but went missing the next day and was found on the ground behind a building with several lacerations on one wing and a swollen elbow, but no broken bones; he/she was in rehab for about a month, then was released back in the nest area, when an observer reported seeing the two fledglings flying together.
2015 was a more peaceful year - the pair laid two eggs, and HB7 and HB8 fledged successfully without any detours.


© Harrison Bay Eagle Cam, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid-February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in early to mid-June.

Tennessee
Pigeon Forge

Link

adults Liberty (F)and Justice (M) thru 2010
adults Independence (F) and Franklin (M)

Liberty and Justice are a pair of non-releasable Bald Eagles cared for by the American Eagle Foundation (AEF) - female Liberty can only see out of one eye so lacks the depth perception needed to hunt in the wild, while male Justice was found with shotgun pellets in a foot and wing, resulting in permanent injuries that would keep him from hunting successfully. They bonded as a pair in 1993, and have successfully raised 14 of their own offspring and several foster chicks for release to the wild from hacking towers in Tennessee. Their three eggs were infertile in 2005; bad weather caused the collapse of their nest and loss of three eggs in 2006; and the one egg Liberty laid in 2007 was infertile - but in 2008 one of the two eggs she laid hatched, and Liberty and Justice successfully raised the resulting eaglet. They laid three eggs in 2009 but none hatched. The eagles were not on cam in 2010; it was reported that they laid two non-fertile eggs, and then fostered two three-day-old eaglets; there was a report on the AEF website that two eaglets were released from the AEF hacking tower in July, though it wasn't clear if they were the two Liberty and Justice had raised.

Perhaps because of Liberty and Justice's advanced age, AEF decided to feature a new pair on-cam in 2011, Independence (F) and Franklin (M). Both are originally from Alaska, and both are non-releasable because of wing injuries. Independence came to the AEF facility in 1994, and Franklin arrived in 1995; they became a pair in 2000 and laid their first eggs in 2002. In 2011, their first year on cam, they laid three eggs, all of which hatched and the three eaglets were successfully released from a hacking tower; the first egg was moved to an incubator shortly after it was laid, due to a tornado warning, and returned to the nest several weeks later; perhaps because of the more consistent artificial incubation, it hatched 6 days before the second egg and a whole week before #3; fortunately there was plenty of food, and all three chicks thrived. Independence and Franklin again laid 3 eggs in 2012, and all three hatched; the chicks were moved to a hacking tower, and all fledged successfully, though it took two tries for the oldest one - she had some rocky landings on her first flight, resulting in an abrasion on the bottom of one foot, so she was returned to AEF for treatment, and finally released about 45 days after her siblings. Franklin and Independence laid two eggs in 2013, and eaglets Thunderbird (M) and Destiny (F) fledged successfully from a hacking tower.

2014 was a puzzling year - Franklin and Indy's eggs were moved to an incubator (and replaced with imitation eggs) so work could be done on their enclosure which had been damaged by a windstorm; the eggs were candled and appeared to be infertile or non-viable - so fertile eggs from other pairs were placed with them as the time for hatching drew near. The first egg hatched March 31 - and the chick was seen lifeless with no obvious cause the next day. The second egg hatched April 2 - and the female killed it. AEF said ""Sometimes there are no answers, and this is one of those times." Indy had successfully raised 29 eaglets, and I know one of her eggs spent time in an incubator in 2011, and she accepted it back without any problem; she may have been hit by a falling branch or something in the storm - but there was no sign of serious injury. The third egg was removed and replaced with a wooden egg; it hatched in an incubator and was successfully fostered with bald eagle pair Hero and Volunteer, and fledged from the hacking tower as H4/Hallmark (F). The cams were switched to the habitat of a different non-releasable pair in mid-April, so we could watch Isaiah (M) and Mrs. Jefferson (F) raise their two chicks. J4/Lady Talon and K4/Battle Force went to the hacking tower with H4/Hallmark, and all fledged successfully.

Because of the nature of the work the American Eagle Foundation does, things happen at their nests that wouldn't happen elsewhere - and some of that is amazing, so I'm going to do another long update for 2015. The cams were on Franklin and Independence (Indy) again in 2015. They laid three eggs - one broke while they were moving a large stick and the other two didn't hatch and wre found to be underdeveloped and infertile, as was the first one - but they ended up fostering a chick that hatched from an abandoned egg produced by Isaiah and Mrs. Jefferson, which was found on the ground a couple of months earlier; although it had gone untended for some period of time, it was put in an incubator - and hatched 36 days later, on May 6! The chick was fostered into Frank and Indy's nest on May 15, so it did appear a bit big for the broken egg shell that was left on the nest as if it had just hatched; that chick, nicknamed "Little E" thrived (which does suggest that Franklin and especially Indy were back to normal after whatever happened last year) and successfully fledged from the hacking tower as L5/Miracle.
But there's more - Isaiah and Mrs. Jefferson weren't featured on cam this year - but AEF reported that their enclosure was damaged during a windstorm, disrupting their incubation activities, so their 4th and 5th eggs for the season were removed and placed in an incubator, and when they hatched, they were fostered with a pair of golden eagles whose own eggs were non-viable. (I'm not sure what happened to their first three eggs, but do know one of AEF's mission is to increase the eagle population in the area, so they may have moved them to an incubator so the pair would lay a second clutch.) Anyway, it sounds as if the egg that became Little E came from that clutch, and at least one of her(?) siblings was in the hack towers at the same time, and that eaglet, named Hope, also fledged successfully.

The nest of non-releasable bald Eagles Independence and Franklin at Pigeon Forge, TN, courtesy of the American Eagle Foundation
Franklin & Independence's nest
© American Eagle Foundation, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late March, chicks in early May, and fledging in mid to late July. The chicks will be removed from the parents at about 5 or 6 weeks of age and transferred to a nearby artificial nest in a hack tower, where they will be released a few weeks later as part of the American Eagle Foundation's captive release program.

Texas
Seagoville

Link

Eagles have been nesting in the John Bunker Sands Wetlands since 2011, and 2015 was their first year on cam. And in the process of finding a photo of the nest, I watched the video by Oncor Energy of them moving the whole arm with the nest from an active power line several miles away to this tower in a much safer location, built just for the eagles - and the eagles moved in! Unfortunately they've been having issues with the cam, and it went down shortly after the eagles laid their egg(s). We do know there was at least one egg, and at least one chick, and that chick fledged successfully - and they have repaired and upgraded the cams, so we're hoping to be able to watch more of the process in 2016.

Seagoville TX eagle nest
Photo from the video of the moving of the nest, courtesy of Oncor

Based on past experience, look for eggs in late January or early February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in early to mid-June.

Virginia
Norfolk
Botanical Garden

no cam

This was a streaming camera with night vision (but not sound - it's near an airport so it's felt we'd hear more planes than eagles).

The nest is in a botanical garden in Norfolk, Virginia. The 2007 nest fell apart after the last chick fledged, and the eagles built a new nest for 2008; Norfolk Botanical Garden (NBG) moved the cam to the new nest. This pair successfully raised 3 chicks in 2006 and 2007; in 2008, practically everything that could go wrong did - they produced 2 (or maybe 3) eggs, but then a four-year-old female started harassing the pair, forcing them from the nest for prolonged periods and leaving the eggs uncovered; eventually the parents appeared to abandon the nest, and two no-longer-viable eggs were recovered. Then the original female returned to the nest and was seen mating with the male - and a month or so after the initial clutch, they produced two eggs - which were apparently broken when the nesting parent jumped up to respond to a large bird (maybe a great horned owl) flying near the nest. The next day she laid the third egg of the second clutch - which successfully hatched. When the chick was about 3 weeks old, a photographer noticed a growth on its beak - and the chick was removed from the nest a few days later for testing; the eaglet (named Easter on the Hancock forum and Buddy and Poink on others) was found to have Avian Pox and was taken to the Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV) for treatment. The treatment was successful, but Easter/Buddy's beak was damaged by the pox, and in August 2009 WCV declared that he was non-releasable, “based on a review of the bird’s treatment over the past 15 month, evaluation of the curvature of the eagle’s beak, and the habituation of this young bird to humans.” His beak will continue to need periodic trimming for the rest of his life, and after considering several options WVC made the juvie, now officially named Buddy, one of their educational birds. 2009 was a much less eventful year; the eagles moved back and rebuilt their former nest, and successfully raised three eaglets. The middle eaglet, nicknamed Azalea, was fitted with a transmitter, and you can follow her travels at http://eagletrak.blogs.wm.edu. The pair again successfully raised three eaglets, all male, in 2010; the oldest was nicknamed Camellia and given a transmitter (same link for updates). It will be interesting to compare his travels with those of his older sister. The eagles are building a new nest for 2011, and NBG has moved the cam so we'll be able to follow the activity in 2011.

The pair again laid three eggs in 2011, all of which hatched. The female was struck and killed by an airplane landing at the adjacent airport when the chicks were about 6 weeks old; it was estimated that she was about 15 years old, and the current pair had been together since 2003, raising 19 eaglets including the three on the nest when she died. The experts involved with the nest felt a single adult would not be able to both feed and protect three rapidly growing eaglets, so all three were removed from the nest and taken to the Wildlife Center of Virginia. The three were released in late July, but the middle chick NX, who was fitted with a transmitter shortly before release, seemed too hot and tired to get good height, so was captured and returned to WCV to recover, and was successfully released a month later; you can follow her travels at http://www.wildlifecenter.org/wp/tracking-nx/. The male was seen with a new female, estimated to be 5-6 years old, in the fall of 2011, so we are hoping the new pair will nest in 2012.

2012 was a sad year for Norfolk. The male's new mate died after flying into power lines, and then several other females spent time courting the male, and occasionally fighting with each other. By the time the male appeared to be bonding with female #4, it was too late for nesting. We enjoyed watching them, and hoped for chicks in 2013 - but unfortunately the USDA Wildlife Service recommended that the nest be removed to reduce the chance of another eagle-airplane collision, and that was done on October 4, 2012. The pair immediately started building two other nests, in trees the male had used before - and after they were well underway, they were also taken down, and some supporting branches were removed, to make it harder for the eagles to rebuild. We are all hoping that the eagles find a tree on private property away from the Botanical Gardens where they can nest safely, out of the public eye. On a personal note, I visited the Norfolk Botanical Garden a couple of days after the nest was initially taken down - my comments and pictures are here - http://www.judybmaine.com/travel/2012_midatlantic/norfolk_2012.htm

As of November 2013, Dad Norfolk and his mate continue to be seen at the Botanical Gardens, and the USDA continues to remove any nests they try to build, and to harrass them in other ways to try to drive them out. It's not working - and it's so very sad. 2014 was much like 2013 - but with luck 2015 will be better - we heard in late October 2014 that Dad Norfolk and his lady have been working on a new nest on private property outside of the Norfolk Botanical Garden - in a place where they should be safe from harassment.

2015 was a wonderful year - Dad Norfolk and his mate successfully raised and fledged a chick from the new nest - and we learned that his mate is not the dark-tailed young female who was with him initially at the NBG - her bands identify her as HE, his offspring from 2009, and a strong young eagle also carrying Mom Norfolk's genes!

And terribly sad news as we get ready for the 2016 season - Dad Norfolk's mate HE died January 6, apparently the result of a collision with a motor vehicle. I'm glad she had the chance to mate and produce a chick - and so sorry that there was only one. Rest in peace, HE, and fly free forever, far beyond the sky.

Norfolk VA Bald Eagle Nest
EmtyBelfry's s'cap - January 12, 2009

Dad Norfolk, October 2014, copyright Mike Inman, all rights reserved, not to be copied or shared without permission
Dad Norfolk in his new nest, October 30, 2014
© Mike Inman, used with permission, all rights reserved,
may not be reproduced or reposted without permission

Based on past experience, look for eggs in the first half of February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in early June.

Virginia
Richmond

Link

The Richmond nest territory was established in 1996 and the cam was installed in 2012. The cam began operating for the first time on January 15, 2012. Eagle history: This pair built a nest along the James River 90 feet up in a loblolly pine in 1995. They abandoned the first nest and built the current nest in 2001. The nest has been used for 10 years and 18 chicks have successfully fledged. In 2011 2 eaglets fledged. The pair laid two eggs in 2012, and both fledged but it was touch and go for a while as fishing was hard after a major storm, and the sibling rivalry was brutal. It appears that the pair is building a new nest for 2013, about 1/2 mile from their 2012 nest - and unfortunately not in a location where a cam is possible, at least for 2013. Hopefully there will be some ground observer reports. Two chicks were seen in the nest during an aerial survey March 11, but only one was seen in the second survey on May 4-5; the remaining chick appeared to be about 8 weeks old and doing well - but I could find no report on whether or not it survived to fledge. (I'm guessing it did - but that's not proof.)

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid-February chicks in mid-March, and fledging in early to mid-June.

Virginia
River Farm

Link

adults George (M) and Martha (F)

This was a new nest for us in 2014. The pair laid three eggs, but one was broken, perhaps by the adults bringing in a large partly-frozen rabbit in anticipation of a hatch; the other two eggs hatched, but the older chick died when he or she was a few days old, perhaps because it was a cold and snowy night and s/he was partly exposed or perhaps because of some underlying issue; the remaining chick fledged successfully but never returned to the nest as most (but not all) chicks do - so we are hoping for the best.
Unfortunately 2015 was even sadder - there were two eggs, but the first chick barely survived the hatching process, and the second egg didn't progress beyond a strong initial pip. We are very much hoping for a better year in 2016.

photo of River Farm bald eagle nest in Virginia, courtesy of Eagle Cam
photo of the nest courtesy of Eagle Cam

Based on past experience, look for eggs in February, chicks in mid or late March, and fledging in mid-June.

Washington
Kent

no cam

This nest is about 90 feet up a tall cottonwood tree, and you can see a bit of Lake Meridian in the distance. The eagles are named Star (female) and Spirit (male), and they've raised 16 eaglets over the past eight years, including two in 2007. The nest collapsed at the end of the 2007 season;
the eagles were seen rebuilding in 2008, but did not lay any eggs. Eagles have been seen in the area, occasionally working on the nest, in 2009 and 2010; there is still a cam, and if they nest, there is a chance the cam will be online again.

Kent nest
landowner
's photo - December 28, 2001 - installation of camera

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid-March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid to late July.

Washington
Lake Washington

Link

This cam is now streaming, with night vision! And it was repositioned in 2009 so there is a better look into the nest bowl.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife posted the following in 2008 about this cam: “This year we have retired the Puget Sound EagleCam and replaced it with the Lake Washington EagleCam. Located in a 100 foot tall Douglas fir tree, the bald eagle pair have been actively building their nest and should be able to be observed increasingly as the mating season and pair-bonding is upon us. This bald eagle cam was installed with a landowner’s invitation and cooperation and with the hope to share the unique views and interactions of a dramatically situated bald eagle nest.” Lake Washington is in the northwest corner of Washington state, not really all that far from Seattle. This cam was new in 2008, and there were two chicks that year, one of which fledged successfully and the other which died of unknown causes when it was 8-1/2 weeks old (the cam was refresh-only the first year, making it harder to see what was happening in the nest). They successfully raised and fledged two chicks in 2009 and 2010. They successfully raised two chicks in 2011, but one was found dead at the foot of the tree when it was 12 weeks old, likely as the result of a mishap during or shortly after fledging; the other fledged successfully. The DFW website suggests there may be a cam upgrade for 2012.

There was a nice new cam for 2012 - but sadly no chicks; the WDFW website suggested that one of the previous pair may have died too close to nesting for a new mate to become established in time for eggs to be laid this year. The pair is visiting regularly so we hope they will nest in 2013. The eagles visited and worked on the nest from time to time in 2013, but did not lay eggs there; not sure if they didn't nest, or if they had a nest elsewhere.

In 2014, everything was going well until the first week of July - the pair returned, laid two eggs, both of which hatched, and the chicks were branching when the nest began to collapse; the good news is that the chicks were already branching, and they seemed to adapt to spending more time on the branches, and eating on the branches, as the nest vanished. It was mostly gone by July 16, when the chicks were 11-1/2 weeks old, and we only saw them occasionally for the next couple of days. There is no local observer posting anywhere as far as I know, so we are hoping for the best.

The eagles didn't return in 2015 - maybe next year.

Lake Washington eagles
soph9's s'cap - March 9, 2010

where the nest used to be
MaryF's s'cap - May 15, 2015

Based on previous experience, look for eggs in mid-March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid July.

Washington
Puget Sound

no cam

This cam was only online one season, in 2007. The pair laid two eggs, one of which hatched. One of the more interesting things we observed is that the second egg was still in the nest seven weeks after the other egg hatched, and the eaglet appeared to be brooding it from time to time.

Puget Sound eaglet
Sherri's s'cap - May 14, 2007
(eaglet is about 2-1/2 weeks old here)

West Virginia
NCTC
Shepherdstown

Link

There is a still cam that refreshes every 30 seconds and is on 24 hours a day, and also streaming video with sound during the nesting season.

Liberty and Belle have been in this location near the Potomac River since late 2002, built their nest mostly in late 2003 and early 2004, and Belle laid her first egg February 14, 2004. The pair raised two chicks in 2004, one in 2005 and three in 2006; they had three eggs in 2007 but none survived the spring storms; they raised three chicks in 2008; they laid three eggs in 2009, but only one hatched - and that chick fledged successfully. In 2010 there was a major snowstorm with over 20" of snow after Belle laid her first two eggs; she kept them covered through the storm, but the snow was piled so high around the nest cup that the eggs were buried shortly after the storm ended. They cleared a new area of the nest and Belle laid a third egg - and there was another foot of snow shortly thereafter; that egg was left uncovered, apparently sitting on snow, a number of times over the next couple of days. It seemed as if Liberty was having trouble getting down to the nest cup (which still had substantial piles of snow around it), so he sometimes stood guard rather than incubating. Immediately after the second storm, they started bringing in more sticks and padding for the nest area - and four days after the third egg, Belle laid a fourth egg. The third egg disappeared after about two weeks - and the fourth egg hatched and the chick fledged successfully. In 2011 the pair laid two eggs; the first one hatched, but the male Liberty did not arrive to provide food or support, and a new younger male kept trying to enter the nest; Belle chased him off - but wasn't able to leave the nest to get food, so the chick died on its fourth day. Belle was observed offering her beak to the chick, and its possible some liquid was transferred, but no food was brought into the nest until shortly after the chick died. The other egg didn't hatch. The body of an adult eagle was found in the vicinity later in the spring; Liberty wasn't banded so its identity couldn't be confirmed, but many people thought it was probably Liberty. After chasing the new male away for a while, Belle began to tolerate his presence, and they appeared to be a pair by the end of the year. Here's hoping 2012 will be a happier year.

Belle and her new mate, known as Shep or Smitty on various forums, laid two eggs, both of which hatched and fledged successfully. It was interesting - and educational - to watch Belle teach her young partner what was expected of him. Once she had laid the eggs, he did a good job of delivering food - but it took a couple of days before he realized that he was supposed to incubate the eggs while she ate. Once he figured that out, he did much of the incubating during the day, allowing Belle time away from the nest. Once the chicks hatched, he upped the food delivery, but it was 5 days before he realized he should be feeding the chicks when he was on nest duty, and in fact it looked as if it took one of the chicks reaching up to grab a bite away from him to trigger the "ah-ha" moment. He is developing into a great parent - and we're learning what's involved in making that happen. It will be interesting to see what happens in 2013. Belle and Shep/Smitty laid two eggs in 2013, and both chicks fledged successfully - and he was a great Dad.

The pair laid three eggs in 2014, and all three hatched, but the middle chick sadly died shortly after hatching; there were some cam issues, but we're pretty sure the other two fledged successfully. Sadly there was also a loss in 2015; there were again three eggs, and all hatched, but the youngest chick was lost when the male brought in a huge fish as the tiny one was beginning to move out of the nest bowl, and plopped the fish on the little one (fly free, Lit'l Bit); the other chicks fledged successfully.

Shepherdstown nest
July 14, 2007 - visit to the site
© 2007 Paula Compton, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in the first half of February, chicks in mid-March, and fledging in early June.

 

entries above this line have been updated

 

Wisconsin
Eagles4Kids

Link

The nest is in Blair, Wisconsin, which is in the western part of the state, not too far from the border with Minnesota and Iowa. The interesting thing about this cam and website is that it is a project of the third and fourth grade classes at the Blair-Taylor Elementary School, in conjunction with the National Eagle Center. The cam came online in 2011, and the website reported that the eagles had fledged two eaglets in each of the previous 5 years. Unfortunately the eagles, known as Lucy and Larry, did not nest in 2011, and there was some suspicion that the original female may have disappeared and been replaced. The pair laid two eggs in 2012 - and the male had to teach the female how to feed newly hatched chicks, adding to the belief that she was a first-time mom; she learned well, and both chicks fledged successfully. As of December 2012, the pair is facing a new challenge - the toes of Lucy's right foot have been badly injured, perhaps by being caught in a trap, and it looks as if she will lose them. Her left foot also appeared swollen, but that may be because she was needing to use it more to compensate because she can't stand on her right foot (though it appears that she can put weight on it - it's the balance that's lacking). I think she's looking better, as she's adapting to what she can and can't do - but she does spend more time sleeping in the nest than is normal for an adult. We're keeping our fingers crossed that it will work out somehow. 2013 was better than we'd feared - Lucy did lose the toes on her right foot, but her left foot stabilized and has gotten stronger; amazingly they laid one egg, and it's perhaps not a bad thing that it didn't hatch, and apparently collapsed about a week after the anticipated hatch date. As of November 2013, Lucy and Larry have returned and are working on their nest.

2014 was a year of transition; another pair was seen in there territory March 6, and Lucy has not been seen since then; Larry remained the resident male and at least three females were seen seen vying for his attention, and one seemed to be spending time perched with Larry before they left the area on May 1st, but no eggs were laid.

2015 brought a new pair to the area; when the eagles returned in September 2014, there was a female who was likely the one who had been with Larry in the late spring, but the male who was seen at the nest was young, with some dark feathers on the head and tail. It took time, but they developed a bond, and the students from the school sponsoring the cam named them Blair (F) and Taylor (M) - and we began looking forward to eggs. However, in mid-February another male appeared, an older male who looked a lot like Larry, though that was never confirmed; Taylor was last seen on February 13th, and the new male, who was called Mister by the Chat moderators, began spending time with Blair, and by the 17th, they were working on the nest together. And on the 18th, Blair laid an egg! With a second one three days later. It's not clear if she had mated with either male in the right time frame for the eggs to be fertile, and Mister showed no interest in the eggs, though he tucked his talons in while on the nest; he brought food for Blair occasionally, but she did all the incubating. Then, on March 3, Taylor returned! He didn't have any obvious injuries, but it seems likely he needed time to heal after his first encounter with Mister, and came back strong, as Mister was not seen again. Taylor initially showed no interest in the eggs beyond watching over them from a perch while Blair was off getting food, but he tentatively began incubating near the end of the hatch window - and continued incubating much longer than Blair did - the pair incubated the eggs for 90 or more days. As of January 2016, Blair and Taylor are back and working on the nest - and we're hoping this will be a good year for them!

camera installation at Eagles4Kids site
October 7, 2011, cam installation - courtesy of Eagles4Kids

Based on past experience, look for eggs in early March, chicks in early to mid-April, and fledging in late June.

Wisconsin
Wolf River

Link

Located on the banks of the Wolf River in Wisconsin, these bald eagles have built a nest in a large white pine tree. The adults, known as George and Martha, laid two eggs in 2012 (their first year on cam); both hatched, and the chicks fledged successfully. 2013 was interesting - a pair of great horned owls arrived at the nest in early February and laid 3 eggs; one hatched, and left the nest when he/she was 45 days old - too early to fledge, but owlets do move onto branches at a younger age than eaglets, and are fed there - so we're hoping all is well; happily the eagles did not show up to reclaim the nest in the middle of all this. It will be interesting to see what happens in 2014.
The eagles worked on the nest and apparently spent some time defending their territory, but no one nested here in 2014. At the end of August, an adult who resembled Martha was found near the nest with a broken wing; the break is near the "wrist" so there wasn't much the rehab could do except keep her safe and see if it healed on its own - and it did! She was released October 6.
The eagles were working on the nest in December 2014, but so far I haven't been able to find much information beyond the fact that the eagles weren't there in April 2015. Don't know if there will be a cam for 2016 or not.


December 9, 2012 - camera replacement - courtesy of Wolf River Eagles

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid to late March, chicks in late April, and fledging in mid to late July.

Yukon
Whitehorse

Link

 

This is an artificial nest sponsored by Yukon Electrical Company, and replaces one that was lost in a storm The nest is located in downtown Whitehorse, but does have trees and a river nearby. 2013 is the first year watching this nest, and the eagles laid three eggs, all of which hatched - and all three eaglets fledged successfully. The pair moved to a new nest for 2014, so there was no cam; local observers reported that there were three chicks and all fledged successfully. A cam was put on the new nest for 2015 but the utility sponsoring the cam felt the quality was not adequate for streaming; they and observers reported there were again three eggs and three chicks, and all fledged successfully. Hoping they'll get the cam working better for 2016.


August 10, 2013 - "Food Drop"
© 2013 arbitrage, used with permission, all rights reserved

Based on past experience, look for eggs in mid April, chicks in mid May, and fledging in early to mid August.

NOTES

All images are the property of the cam from which they were taken and/or the person/organization credited.
Thank you for letting me use the images for this compilation.

©2007-2016 Judy Barrows
JudyBWebDesign.com

judyb@judyb-eagles.com